Bill Bonner

In the sushi again…just like we said!

The US stock market managed a weak rally yesterday. The Dow rose 56 points. Gold fell, closing the day below $1,200.

This morning, stocks are generally going down again all over the world.

Why does everything seem to be going down? Because it’s a Great Correction, what else?

The correction is doing its work. The feds tried to stop it with trillions in loans, guarantees, and ‘stimulus’ spending. They failed. Over the last three weeks we have had confirmation after confirmation – the recovery ain’t happening. Unemployment is getting worse. Prices are falling – even the price of labor. The banks don’t lend and the people don’t spend.

Cities and states are running out of money. Households are going broke. And the stock market looks like it wants to roll over and die.

Is that a great correction, or what?

Dear readers who are hoping to get rich on gold are probably going to have to wait. We’ve entered a period of gentle de-leveraging – at least that’s what it looks like today. Until we get some real crises – or better yet, some real inflation – gold will probably drift downwards.

Not that we’re worried about it. Ben Bernanke has added more to the nation’s monetary base than all the Fed chairmen that came before him combined – including Alan Greenspan. But don’t have any illusions. It can take a long time for this monetary inflation to turn into the kind of inflation that sends the price of gold soaring. And a lot can happen along the way.

But for now, businesses are reducing their debt. Households are reducing their debt. Even government is cutting back.

Bloomberg:

Rich nations will reduce their primary budget deficits, excluding interest payments, by 1.6 percentage points next year, the most since the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development began keeping records in 1970, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co. economists. The budget squeeze will lop 0.9 percentage point off growth in 2011.

Greece is on target to cut its deficit in half. Europe, generally, is making a big effort to trim deficits and keep debt from getting out of control. They’ve all been rapped on the knuckles. They all know what happens when you let debt get away from you.

But people come to think what they need to think when they need to think it. And right now, the US government doesn’t need to think that debt is such a bad thing. It can borrow at low rates – almost indefinitely. In fact, US treasury yields are falling…it’s getting cheaper and cheaper for the US to bankrupt itself.

Which is what makes us think we have entered a period of gentle, pernicious de-leveraging.

The rest of the world is saving. What happens to the savings? The savers can thank the USA for taking them off their hands. While the rest of the world saves, the US is still borrowing…helping the world get rid of its surplus savings. In effect, the US government is now playing Japan’s role in its long, tired saga of de-leveraging. We guessed that the US would follow Japan into a long, slow, soft slump. Okay…we were 10 years too early! But now, it seems to be happening.

In Japan, the government helpfully absorbed household savings for 20 years. This allowed the people to de-leverage while the government kept spending. Now, the US is absorbing much of the world’s savings…allowing the rest of the world to put its balance sheets in order, while the US government keeps ‘stimulating.’

In the end, both programs are absurd. The savings disappear in boondoggles and bailouts. And the stimulus doesn’t stimulate anything but more government spending. But it suits the egos of the economists who imagine they are saving the world.

An economy can go on like this – softly, gently destroying savings…quietly bankrupting the government – for many, many years. That could be what is coming now.

But wait. The US Senate refused to extend unemployment benefits. Even in the US, Republicans are talking about ‘austerity.’ Paul Krugman is hopping mad, referring to a coalition of the “heartless, the clueless and the confused” that is refusing to go along with his ‘spend, spend, spend’ agenda. All of a sudden, the Americans seem to be catching the ‘austerity’ bug, too. Uh oh…this could be a disaster for everyone. If everyone saves, who will use their savings? Who will spend? Who will keep the wheels of commerce turning? Who will keep the lights on in the malls and the grills hot in the restaurants?

What will happen if all the grasshoppers suddenly become ants…and all of them go on a rampage of financial prudence? Wouldn’t it cause a new economic Dark Age for the whole world?

Nah, don’t worry about it. In the first place, governments are not reducing their debts. They are just moderating the rate at which they add to them. In the second place, there’s plenty of demand coming on line from the emerging economies. And in the third place, the world has too much debt; getting rid of it would be no bad thing – even if it occasioned a difficult period of adjustment.

More importantly, the feds are zombies. The fewer resources they take the better off we are.

Bill Bonner
for The Daily Reckoning

Bill Bonner

Since founding Agora Inc. in 1979, Bill Bonner has found success in numerous industries. His unique writing style, philanthropic undertakings and preservationist activities have been recognized by some of America's most respected authorities. With his friend and colleague Addison Wiggin, he co-founded The Daily Reckoning in 1999, and together they co-wrote the New York Times best-selling books Financial Reckoning Day and Empire of Debt. His other works include Mobs, Messiahs and Markets (with Lila Rajiva), Dice Have No Memory, and most recently, Hormegeddon: How Too Much of a Good Thing Leads to Disaster. His most recent project is The Bill Bonner Letter.

Recent Articles

Can Money Printing Cause Deflation?

Marc Faber

"There has been an issue that has preoccupied my mind for a long time," writes Dr. Marc Faber. "In economics, it is generally accepted that if the quantity of money and credit is increased, prices will rise… However, since economics is so complex… I question whether the expansion of central banks' balance sheets and policies of zero interest rates could have a deflationary impact…" The good doctor wrestles with the question, in today's essay...


Forget the Oil Crash – Crush the Market With Biotech Stocks

Greg Guenthner

The Biotech iShares ETF is up 23% since the Oct. 15th bottom. No, that is not a typo. Biotechs have torched the S&P over the past two months--more than doubling the returns of the big index. And biotechs as a group are up more than 38% year-to-date. In fact, since we first highlighted the June comeback, the Biotech iShares have gone nowhere but up.


How Low Will Oil Go – And What Can You Do?

Matt Insley

The oil market has been under siege for six months. From service providers to producers this downturn has been painful. Of course, we’ve known all along that oil prices were a little toppy over the summer. In fact, when asked just how low oil prices could go I usually answered with a simple “lower than you’d expect…”


Cuba’s Berlin Wall Moment

Peter Coyne

Our forecast that Cuba would be open and integrated within 5-10 years is on track after yesterday's big announcement. Ahead of schedule, even. Click here to see how some investors have profited and what the island's likely future is...


The $4 LED Trend You Don’t Want to Miss

Chris Mayer

The opportunity to sell and install LEDs is enormous. We’re talking about over a billion lighting fixtures. And the areas with the largest potential -- like parking lots -- have barely begun to change. Banker to the presidents Chris Mayer says you could triple your money in this new tech trend. Here's what you need to know.


How to Make the Casinos Pay You for a Change

Greg Guenthner

It's a theme we've shared with you since April. And it's only gotten worse. The gaming industry has come under all sorts of pressure--a situation I first noticed in the charts. The powerful, multi-year uptrends started showing cracks. And it wasn't long before those cracks turned into gaping holes you could drive a friggin' truck through. That's where things stand today.