Addison Wiggin

Today, we take a belated bow for calling the “official” end of the recession… by declaring a “double dip” to be unofficially under way.

Last week, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) declared the Great Recession ended in June 2009. Turns out, looking back, we called it in real-time — relying on a single obscure indicator.

It’s called “capacity utilization” — that is, all the plant, equipment and other resources business have at their disposal, and what percentage of it businesses are actually putting to work.

On June 17, 2009, we pointed out that “over the last 40 years, a bottom in capacity utilization has marked the precise end of recessions.”

“Having no interest in real-time forecasting,” we followed up on Aug. 14, 2009, “the NBER won’t officially call an end to this recession until it’s long past. It took until December 2008 to tell us that this whole mess started in December 2007.

“Heh,” we concluded “by the time the NBER calls an end to this one, we might have begun another.

And so it goes. Today, we can hardly be precise about when it started. We can only say we believe the “double dip” is already under way.

One “tell” of the double dip: The horrible numbers reflecting private-sector investment. We brought you this last Tuesday, but it’s worth revisiting. The “growth” in GDP that’s come about since June 2009 owes almost entirely to growth in government spending — mostly in the form of transfer payments.

Meanwhile, gross domestic private investment has shrunk from 17.3% of GDP at the recession’s start to 11.3% last year. Worse still is that the majority of that figure is devoted to simply repairing and maintaining existing plant and equipment… and how it’s growing.

Investment in new plant and equipment made up an already low 40% of gross domestic private investment at the start of the recession. Last year, it was a paltry 3.5%.

Capital has gone on strike. What’s it doing instead?

“Talking heads are gushing over the piles of cash on corporate balance sheets,” grouses Dan Amoss this morning. “But how is this good for shareholder value? Since when have big corporations done intelligent things with cash?

“Most of the time, they haven’t. Instead, they overpay for their stock repurchases and overpay for acquisitions.”

And overpay the same folks who are making those decisions.

Right on cue, Standard & Poor’s reports that S&P 500 companies increased their stock buybacks during the second quarter by 221% compared to a year earlier — the fourth quarter in a row that buybacks have grown. 257 of the companies in the index — more than half — took part in buyback programs during Q2.

“No CEO wants to take the career risk of aggressively deploying capital when acquisition targets are dirt-cheap,” Dan surmises. Again on cue, there were a flurry of acquisition announcements just today…

  • Wal-Mart is offering $4.3 billion for South Africa’s Massmart
  • Anglo-Dutch conglomerate Unilever is buying Alberto-Culver, the maker of beauty products, for $3.7 billion
  • Southwest Airlines will fork over $1.4 billion to buy AirTran.

“High corporate cash balances don’t reflect a healthy economy,” Dan asserts. “Companies that hoard cash aren’t expanding. If they’re not expanding, they’re not going to hire new employees.

“It doesn’t help that Congress made hiring more expensive with the health care law and countless other layers of bureaucratic red tape. Weighed against a mountain of debt and other liabilities — both on- and off-balance sheet liabilities — corporate cash balances are much less impressive.”

The second indication we’ve already begun another recession: M3 money supply.

M3 is the broadest possible measure of money in the system including cash, savings accounts, money market funds, etc. The Federal Reserve stopped tracking M3 in 2006 because they say they no longer find it useful.

John Williams of Shadowstats.com, however, has stayed on top of it, easily collecting the data needed to make this prognostication:

“M3 rising to the upside does not necessarily signal and economic upturn,” says Williams, explaining the lines on the graph above. “Yet whenever annual growth in M3 has turned negative, a recession always has followed, usually within six-nine months.”

Real M3 generated a signal in December 2009 for a downturn. How much time has elapsed? Oh, about nine months.

“The current weakness,” says John, “will eventually gain official recognition as the second down leg of a double-dip recession.”

“We are now at a state where,” Alan Greenspan said Friday, sounding almost lucid, “excluding World War II, we are in the worst shape of relationship between borrowing capacity and debt, I suspect, since 1791…

“We don’t know at this stage why or how the markets respond to this sort of — this type of event. And I think we’re taking a very high risk… In 1979, for example, everyone expected, yes, we have a little inflation, but there is not going to be a real problem.

“Within a very short time, the bond markets broke. Interest rates went up sharply. Mortgage rates went up sharply. The economy went into a real serious depression. And my basic — I said ‘depression.’ I meant recession.

“My problem, basically, is that economists can’t make these forecasts.”

Good thing we’re not economists, eh?

Addison Wiggin
for The Daily Reckoning

Addison Wiggin

Addison Wiggin is the executive publisher of Agora Financial, LLC, a fiercely independent economic forecasting and financial research firm. He's the creator and editorial director of Agora Financial's daily 5 Min. Forecast and editorial director of The Daily Reckoning. Wiggin is the founder of Agora Entertainment, executive producer and co-writer of I.O.U.S.A., which was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, the 2009 Critics Choice Award for Best Documentary Feature, and was also shortlisted for a 2009 Academy Award. He is the author of the companion book of the film I.O.U.S.A.and his second edition of The Demise of the Dollar, and Why it's Even Better for Your Investments was just fully revised and updated. Wiggin is a three-time New York Times best-selling author whose work has been recognized by The New York Times Magazine, The Economist, Worth, The New York Times, The Washington Post as well as major network news programs. He also co-authored international bestsellers Financial Reckoning Day and Empire of Debt with Bill Bonner.

Recent Articles

5 Min. Forecast
How the Swiss Could Set Off a Financial Avalanche

Dave Gonigam

There have been quite a few disappointing numbers in the global economy recently. But as these numbers are just economic "snowflakes" building toward a financial avalanche. All you need is one to push it over the edge. And as Dave Gonigam explains, the deciding snowflake may come from Switzerland. Read on...


Addison Wiggin
One World, One Bank, One Currency

Addison Wiggin

After the 2008 financial crisis, little could be heard over the deafening cries of "mission accomplished." And while the Fed's massive QE program seemed to work, the question remains: for how long? Addison Wiggin explains why the next round of QE will fail miserably, paving the way for the IMF to step in with something called "special drawing rights." Read on...


Addison Wiggin
Profit from Global Warming, Even if You Don’t Believe In It

Addison Wiggin

Global warming is one of the most debated subjects of the last few years. But regardless of whether you're a "true believer" or a merely an unconvinced skeptic, there are significant ways to make serious money from this controversial topic. Today, Addison Wiggin brings you three of them. Read on...


Don’t Drink the Tap Water (It’s Not What You Think)

Chris Campbell

Under the auspices of benefiting public health, the government has been administering medication to you and your family for generations. But is it really necessary? Or worse... Could it actually be harmful? Chris Campbell takes a closer look at this, and other personal health decisions the feds don't trust you to make...


One Metal to Watch in the Current Commodity Crash

Greg Guenthner

Commodities have been in freefall lately. Everything from corn to soy beans to precious metals is headed lower right now. But is this just a brief downturn, or is this the beginning of a long-term trend? Greg Guenthner explains, with a closer look at one specific precious metal that could snap back violently before heading lower. Read on...


Extra!
What to Hold When the U.S. Economic Blimp Deflates

Jim Mosquera

The inflation vs. deflation debate is a heated one. Heck, it almost brought Peter Schiff and Harry Dent to blows. But at the core of this debate is a common misunderstanding of the nature of both inflation and deflation. Today, Jim Mosquera seeks to explain each... and which one the U.S. is more likely to experience. Read on...