Addison Wiggin

[This article originally appeared in The Daily Reckoning on June 27, 2013]

“The problem with the French is… they don’t have a word for ‘entrepreneur.’” – rumored to have been uttered by President George W. Bush to British Prime Minister Tony Blair

“I get up in the morning,” our friend Juan Enriquez told us during an interview one day late in 2011, “I read the paper and see all the bad things going on with the debt, deficits, wars and the economy. Then, I step into a lab and see all the potential breakthroughs the scientists I work with are about to unveil.”

We began following Enriquez with a camera crew not long after the I.O.U.S.A. project had run its course. Among other eccentric pursuits, Juan helped finance the mapping of the human genome with Craig Venter.

During I.O.U.S.A., we kept hearing the tandem refrain “Deficits don’t matter” and “We’ll grow our way out of this.” We wanted to learn from entrepreneurs on the front lines… who, in fact, is going to help grow our way out of the debt crisis?

Enriquez’s greatest fear at the time was that the political world would overwhelm the entrepreneurs — and the financial markets they depend on — before their discoveries could get put to good use. In fact, Juan’s bipolar view — debt, deficits and war versus inspiration, innovation and achievement — inspired the theme of this year’s Agora Financial Investment Symposium in Vancouver: “The Tale of Two Americas.”

“When you look at the world,” a Symposium regular said, expressing a similar sentiment, “you see one contradiction after another. Cyber warfare, rogue political leaders, random acts of terror, the militarization of police and expanded surveillance equipment and drone usage make for a future resembling an Orwellian nightmare.

“But at the same time, you can track breathtaking technological breakthroughs in oil exploration and new technologies that will revolutionize our health care, computing, automobiles, communication and agriculture… the many items we use every day.”

China is one such contradiction. For the past two days, we’ve focused on their economic slump. But despite the mandarin bear market, China’s innovators are making leaps and bounds. By 2015, they will graduate 17,000 postdoctoral fellows in science, math and engineering. That’s a 60% increase from 2010.

They’re building supercomputers that rival IBM’s and 3-D printers big enough to print air wings. The Chinese also granted 217,000 patents last year — a 26% increase in the past two years alone.

The German economist Joseph Schumpeter famously observed a similar bipolar disorder during the great credit bust of the 1930s.

“Lack of outlets, excess capacity, complete deadlock,” he wrote in Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, “in the end regular recurrence of national bankruptcies and other disasters — perhaps world wars from sheer capitalist despair — may confidently be anticipated. History is as simple as that.

“The opening up of new markets, foreign or domestic, and the organizational development from the craft shop and factory to such concerns as U.S. Steel illustrate the same process of industrial mutation — if I may use that biological term — that incessantly revolutionizes the economic structure from within, incessantly destroying the old one, incessantly creating a new one. This process of Creative Destruction is the essential fact about capitalism.

In his day, Schumpeter witnessed the triumphs of radio, frozen food, the gas stove and the traffic light — all technologies we currently take for granted. But his observations of “how” these innovations come about remain as relevant today as ever.

“Existing structures and all the conditions of doing business,” Schumpeter concluded, “are always in a process of change. Every situation is being upset before it has had time to work itself out. Economic progress, in a capitalist society, means turmoil.”

In an ideal world, entrepreneurs, innovators, the risks takers, would be free to embrace the turmoil at their own peril. But no… in the real world, we have the meddlers, the world improvers, (ahem) bureaucrats.

Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled lawsuits against generic drug producers. “The nation’s most widely used medications,” reports the LA Times, “generic drugs, now carry a legal side effect: If you’re badly injured by one of them, you can’t sue the manufacturer.”

The seen effect? Generic drugs will stay low-cost. And the unseen effect? Good luck finding recourse if you swallow a pill from China that you think is Viagra but is really filled with yellow highway paint. Yes, you read that right — supply chains for drug companies are badly tainted.

Good luck finding a fix within the political system. Our money is on new entrepreneurs staying 10 steps ahead of the suits in D.C.

Regards,

Addison Wiggin
for The Daily Reckoning

P.S. As the tug-o-war between government meddlers and entrepreneurs continues, the innovators are constantly coming up with new and interesting ways to further projects. Readers of the Daily Reckoning email often have unique opportunities to take advantage of these new projects. If you’re not yet receiving the Daily Reckoning email, sign up for free, right here, and find out for yourself.

Addison Wiggin

Addison Wiggin is the executive publisher of Agora Financial, LLC, a fiercely independent economic forecasting and financial research firm. He's the creator and editorial director of Agora Financial's daily 5 Min. Forecast and editorial director of The Daily Reckoning. Wiggin is the founder of Agora Entertainment, executive producer and co-writer of I.O.U.S.A., which was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, the 2009 Critics Choice Award for Best Documentary Feature, and was also shortlisted for a 2009 Academy Award. He is the author of the companion book of the film I.O.U.S.A.and his second edition of The Demise of the Dollar, and Why it's Even Better for Your Investments was just fully revised and updated. Wiggin is a three-time New York Times best-selling author whose work has been recognized by The New York Times Magazine, The Economist, Worth, The New York Times, The Washington Post as well as major network news programs. He also co-authored international bestsellers Financial Reckoning Day and Empire of Debt with Bill Bonner.

Recent Articles

In the Downdraft of Hormegeddon

Bill Bonner

The economist Milton Friedman didn’t go far enough when he said, “Concentrated power is not rendered harmless by the good intentions of those who create it.” Oftentimes, that power is rendered more harmful -- to the point of Hormegeddon -- the better the intentions behind it. In today's essay, Bill Bonner highlights the conditions necessary for popular delusions and the disasters they lead to. Read on...


Addison Wiggin
Health Care Costs: Still the Pig in the Federal Python

Addison Wiggin

Right now, health care makes up about 25% of the federal budget. A scary statistic to be sure... But here's an even scarier one: health care's portion of the federal budget doubles roughly every 20 years. Yikes! Addison Wiggin explains why this is and what needs to change to prevent health care from taking up half the federal budget. Read on...


Six Signs Your Government’s Too Big

Chris Campbell

Is your government too big? Find out in today’s Laissez Faire Today with six “red flags” to look out for. Chris Campbell covers everything from one ObamaCare whistleblower to the strange case of our new Ebola czar. Read on…


McDisaster: Fast Food Is Dying – Make a Killing From It…

Greg Guenthner

McDonalds stock is getting crushed right now. Shares have been in a tailspin since June. But it’s not just Mickey Dee’s. Coca Cola shares are in freefall, too. Bad news for them. But if you want to rake in a pile of easy money, it could be great news for you. See, Americans just aren’t choking down this junk like they used to. The fast food burger, fries and a Coke are just down payments on an early coronary - and Type II diabetes. And everyone’s finally gotten the message. So how can you play the trend? Greg Guenthner explains…


In the Year 2024

James Rickards

Panopticon goggles? Severe market panic in 2018? Gold confiscation by 2020? Jim Rickards' shocking thought-piece in the spirit of A Brave New World or 1984. Click to see how markets, economics, your money, gold, privacy, wealth building and more look a decade from now in the year 2024...