Eric Fry

The US economy is still broken, which is the only plausible reason why bonds might not be a “sell.” But then Bernanke keeps trying to fix the economy, which is the best reason why bonds probably are not a “buy.”

According to conventional wisdom, a sluggish economy tends to reduce demand for credit, which, therefore, tends to keep interest rates low… all else being equal. Robust economic conditions, on the other hand, tend to increase demand for credit, which tends to push interest rates higher…all else being equal.

But “all else” is almost never equal, especially not in the America of 2011. Today in America, most welfare recipients possess a better balance sheet than the US government; most teenagers display greater fiscal responsibility that a Congressman; most comic books contain more gravitas than the minutes of a Federal Open Market Committee meeting.

Yes, that’s right, our national finances are a joke, perpetrated by a troupe of Ivy League educated jesters. As we noted in Tuesday’s edition of The Daily Reckoning, the IRS could double its income tax receipts and the federal government would still operate in the red. And since our elected officials are unwilling to propose legitimate remedies (mostly because we voters would be unwilling to reelect them if they did), the job of fixing this mess falls to Ben Bernanke.

But he can’t fix it. He’s just a guy with an impressive résumé and stupid ideas. He can try to paper over trillion-dollar deficits by printing dollars and buying Treasury debt, but it won’t work. And the more he tries to make it work, the less folks around the world desire to hold dollars. That’s a very dangerous game he’s playing.

When individuals lose faith in a faith-based currency, bad things happen…often quickly. Once a nation loses the trust that supports its currency, that nation also loses the trust that supports its bond market. That’s why a currency crisis usually strolls hand-in-hand with a sovereign debt crisis.

These twin disasters tend to unfold very quickly. Think: Mexico, 1994; Thailand, 1997; Russia, 1998 and Argentina, 1999… Or think: America, 1979.

Back in the 1970s, a US “inflation problem” became a “dollar problem” which became a “bond market problem.” After a while, cause and effect became indistinguishable from one another.

Shortly after President Nixon severed the dollar’s last remaining connection to gold in 1971, inflation rates started edging higher. The annual CPI readings soared from 3.3% in 1971 to 9% in 1973 and 12% during the Arab oil embargo year of 1974.

In October of 1974, President Ford announced his infamous “Whip Inflation Now” campaign. In a speech before Congress, Ford declared inflation, “public enemy number one” and announced a series of measures to combat it.

But President Ford did not whip inflation…and neither did President Carter. Although inflation rates dipped back down toward the 6% range in 1976 and ’77, they skyrocketed shortly thereafter. Dollar-holders and T-bond holders both suffered mightily.

Less than a month after President Carter’s inauguration, the US Treasury issued its first 30-year bond – the 7 5/8s of 2007. Over the next four years this bond lost nearly half its value, as inflation and bond yields both soared toward 15%.

President Carter responded to this dire situation by issuing T-bonds denominated in Deutschemarks and Swiss francs. In 1978, these so-called Carter Bonds came to market, with the hope of attracting investors who would not buy the Treasury’s dollar-denominated bonds. The buyers of these unique bonds fared pretty well; the buyers of traditional Treasury bonds, not so much.

From 1978 to 1981 inflation continued soaring, which meant that the dollar and the bond market continued tumbling. The bond market shellacking of the late 1970s was swift and severe, as the chart below illustrates.

Upward Yield Trend and Downward Price Trend of 10-Year Treasury Notes in the 1970s

Could history repeat itself? Absolutely.

Could it happen soon? Why not?

Cautious investors may wish to move to the sidelines and watch the spectacle from a safe distance. Aggressive investors and/or speculators may wish to dive into the fray and place bets against the bond market.

The bond market selloff of early 2009 provides a glimpse of the profit potential. With the benefit of flawless hindsight, an investor could have sold short “TLT,” the iShares Barclays 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF on December 30, 2008 and closed out the position six months later for a hefty 27% gain. That’s a big winner in “Bond Land.”

10-Year Treasury Note Yield vs. the iShares Barclays 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF

If, as we suspect, a large-scale bond bear market is likely to begin soon, investors will not require flawless hindsight to place a profitable bet on the short side… just a little foresight…and an appetite for betting against Ben Bernanke.

But remember, short selling is very risky. The potential for loss is infinite.

Eric Fry
for The Daily Reckoning

Eric Fry

Eric J. Fry, Agora Financial's Editorial Director, has been a specialist in international equities for nearly two decades. He was a professional portfolio manager for more than 10 years, specializing in international investment strategies and short-selling.  Following his successes in professional money management, Mr. Fry joined the Wall Street-based publishing operations of James Grant, editor of the prestigious Grant's Interest Rate Observer. Working alongside Grant, Mr. Fry produced Grant's International and Apogee Research, institutional research products dedicated to international investment opportunities and short selling. 

Mr. Fry subsequently joined Agora Inc., as Editorial Director. In this role, Mr. Fry  supervises the editorial and research processes of numerous investment letters and services. Mr. Fry also publishes investment insights and commentary under his own byline as Editor of The Daily Reckoning. Mr. Fry authored the first comprehensive guide to investing internationally with American Depository Receipts.  His views and investment insights have appeared in numerous publications including Time, Barron's, Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, Business Week, USA Today, Los Angeles Times and Money.

  • Orville & Wilbur Wright

    And one in four Amerikan mortgages are “under water” meaning they owe more on their house than the place is worth.

  • CT

    It certainly looks as if Capitalism is failing most people. Hmmmm

  • SoonerShooter

    Capitalism is not failing, politicians and the US government is – this is a huge distinction. If you dislike the US system, make a decision to embrace something you do like elsewhere and denounce your US citizenship – I suspect they would love to have you as a subject. The grass is always greener . . . right?

  • Roland

    Wrong. If a US citizen dislikes the US system, then like any other citizen, he can work to change his country’s system.

    Systems come and go. Peoples must endure.

Recent Articles

Bill Bonner
Why the Government Views You As Collateral Damage

Bill Bonner

The economist Milton Friedman didn't go far enough when he said, "Concentrated power is not rendered harmless by the good intentions of those who create it." In fact, as Bill Bonner explains, those same good intentions are often used as pavement on a road that leads to a rather ominous and fiery destination. Read on...


Your Chance to Cash In on a Massive Infrastructure Overhaul

Josh Grasmick

Since the Internet boom of the 1990s, Internet infrastructure has not had a major upgrade in carrying capacity. Now, for the first time in more than a decade, an immense spending cycle is about to be set in motion, and it's aimed at upgrading those "old pipes." Josh Grasmick explains how you can get in on the ground floor of this investment trend...


Laissez Faire
How Bitcoin Can Simplify Your Dinner Plans

Jeffrey Tucker

The best use of a new technology is to solve an old problem you never gave much thought to. It's these problems that become so common, people naturally come to accept them. Now Bitcoin is doing just that, by helping to solve some of the simplest (and most common) problems people face... like splitting a dinner bill. Jeffrey Tucker explains...


Get Ready for Coal’s Big Comeback

Greg Guenthner

Over the past three years, few investments have performed worse than coal. Investors hate it because coal stocks bring them nothing but pain. Environmentalists hate coal because it pollutes. And the list goes on. But recent price action suggests that some of those attitudes might be changing. Greg Guenthner explains...


Bill Bonner
An Easy Way to Avoid Pig-Headed Mistakes

Bill Bonner

Taken individually, most people perform relatively well in their daily lives. They get up, drive to work and interact with various other people, largely without incident. But when big groups of people get together, they can be incredibly pig-headed, demanding "action" when the best course of action would simply be inaction. And before you know it, chaos ensues. Bill Bonner explains...