Bill Bonner

We got a chuckle out of Thomas Friedman. Maybe he would be good as a brick mason. Or maybe a baker. Shame he got caught up in journalism. He has no talent for it.

In a recent column he tells us that “Average is over.” Typically, it makes no sense. What Friedman seems to mean is that an average person can’t expect to do very well in today’s America. He says average guys are being replaced by robots and Chinese people.

There’s even a new device that will make waiters obsolete. You go into a restaurant. You find a computer at your table. You use it to order your food.

Okay, so what?

Friedman strings together words into things that look like sentences that sound as though they have meaning. But if you stop to think about them, even for a second, you realize that there is no meaning there.

Perhaps he might be replaced by a computer. It could be programmed to create things that resembled real thoughts.

“Everyone needs to find their [sic] extra — their unique value contribution that makes them stand out in whatever is their field of employment.

“Average is over.”

So, let’s imagine that people take this advice, whatever it is. They find their extra. They all stand out. Then, what have you got? You have a different average, don’t you? The average fellow has an extra. So, if the average guy has an extra…he has no extra at all, does he? He can’t stand out in a field of outstanding guys.

Average isn’t over. Extra is over.

But Freidman persists. He notices statistics that purport to show that the average college graduate suffers less unemployment than the average high school graduate. This leads him to propose that the feds spend billions more to send more people to college.

But wait a minute. Does the job pool expand just because you’ve fluffed up the average resume? Or do you merely have more people with college degrees competing with computer programs to wait on tables?

We don’t know. But we’re damned sure Friedman has no clue either.

Regards,

Bill Bonner
for The Daily Reckoning

Bill Bonner

Since founding Agora Inc. in 1979, Bill Bonner has found success in numerous industries. His unique writing style, philanthropic undertakings and preservationist activities have been recognized by some of America's most respected authorities. With his friend and colleague Addison Wiggin, he co-founded The Daily Reckoning in 1999, and together they co-wrote the New York Times best-selling books Financial Reckoning Day and Empire of Debt. His other works include Mobs, Messiahs and Markets (with Lila Rajiva), Dice Have No Memory, and most recently, Hormegeddon: How Too Much of a Good Thing Leads to Disaster. His most recent project is The Bill Bonner Letter.

Recent Articles

Addison Wiggin
A Manifesto, of Sorts

Addison Wiggin

More than a decade ago, Addison Wiggin helped co-found the Daily Reckoning with Bill Bonner. Today, he recalls this life-changing experience, and explains how - despite being rooted in the world of finance - it is and will always be about much more than money. Read on...


4 DIY Halloween Costumes You Can Make in 10 Minutes or Less

Peter Coyne

Halloween is tonight! And just in case you waited until the last second to think about what you're going to wear, here are four costume ideas you can easily put together in about 10 minutes or less. With these costumes you'll be the hit of your friend's party - provided you're friends with a bunch of economists. (Downloadable masks included...) Happy Halloween!


Bill Bonner
4 Basic Truths to Help You Navigate the Financial News

Bill Bonner

The financial news is full of misinformation - reported by unreliable pundits and taken at face value by an easily swayed public that doesn't really no better. That's why today, Bill Bonner relays the four basic truths he's discovered during his 30 year career in the financial industry to help you make sense of it all. Read on...


Extra!
How YOU Can Help Pass the Swiss Gold Referendum

Grant Williams

For those who doubt the effectiveness of the Swiss Gold Initiative, Grant Williams has a few startling charts to show you. Today, he relays just how popular this movement is, and how you can actually influence the outcome... no matter where in the world you call home. Read on...


How Small Cap Stocks Saved the Market

Greg Guenthner

For most of the year, no one wanted small cap stocks in their portfolios. But over the last three weeks, few sectors of the market have performed better than small caps. Greg Guenthner explains how to use this to your advantage... and what to expect for the rest of 2014. Read on...