Linda Brady Traynham

Shooters, Ron Holland is the most reading fun I’ve had since discovering C. S. Stirling, and a couple of more articles like the last two may set that mark back to C. Northcote Parkinson. Dear glory, a man who writes elegant prose, has a brilliantly logical mind, and understands the true causes of the War of the Rebellion?! I wouldn’t be surprised to learn he keeps goats, smokes, and had served with the French Foreign Legion or with our guys in Viet Nam as a gunny, making him practically perfect if anything happens to my darling Charles. (I know…odd, the things ladies find attractive…)

Ron also introduced a subject I have been itching to discuss here for at least six months, bless him.

Strangely enough, given that paean, I’m going to begin by disagreeing with my new candidate for hero. He wrote, “We need to forget the causes of the earlier War Between the States, regional differences, slavery, tariffs and other related issues.”

No, no, dear man, we must not forget the causes of the First War of the Rebellion because we are still at odds over precisely the same issues. We still have very strong regional differences and an even larger one of city rats and illegals vs. country mice; slavery now comes in the form of wage and welfare plantation, tariffs are still a big issue (see my modest archived discussion of the nasty jump in the price of tires), and consider that now, as then, the root cause was a corrupt, big money-controlled Congress that had out-run what it could confiscate from the citizens easily. Two ways of solving the problem occurred to the in-crowd back then, the first being to declare that the western border of the US was the Mississippi River permanently and pluck those caged off at their leisure, while the second was to conquer and rape the Southern states which were the wealthy area at that time.

No contest.

A population-dense industrial nation expected to find the less-populated agrarian portion of the nation far easier pickings than they turned out to be, a mistake Washington continues to make in backwaters ranging from Viet Nam to Afghanistan.

Slavery was being phased out as quickly as was feasible primarily because slaves are the most expensive–and least productive–form of labor, and let us not forget that all of the slavers were Yankees, who not only had virtually all the shipping but a great many slaves themselves. Yankees are the ones who came up with a solution to King Cotton’s demand for employees; we didn’t like it, but we had no alternative; everybody down here was already working. Lincoln’s (in)famous “Emancipation Proclamation” didn’t free a single slave in Yankee-held territory and it didn’t free any in the South at the time, either. I am not a fan of the original Illinois politico (or any of his successors), and Lincoln used the slavery issue cynically for emotional effect and spin. READ his opinion of blacks; it is well documented. (Ronald and Donald Kennedy’s The South Was Right is meticulously documented and official correspondence between Lincoln and his generals will turn your stomachs. Their idea, carried out brilliantly in war efforts and “Reconstruction” was to beat the South so far into submission that it would never recover. They were quite successful.) Ah, yesss, the Rothschilds and similar friends have made out well for centuries by funding both sides of wars while Krupps et al. provided munitions to both combatants and both stirred up conflict. That’s why I suggested investing in “defense” stocks in “Juggling Act.”

There is, indeed, a large and growing feeling that fiscal and cultural sanity can be regained only by going our separate ways. North Carolina has a vigorous movement, as do other South’n states and the Montana-Idaho-Wyoming-Utah area, and even Hawaii wants Liliuokalani’s throne and Iolani Palace back. (Chuckle…I say give it to ‘em. An island kingdom 5,000 miles from anywhere that has been firmly under the control of Democrats and the Japanese for half a century is something we need to support about as much as we do southern California.)

There is a very easy, obvious solution to getting the ball rolling, and if there is anything we have an amplitude of at present it is snow, literally and figuratively.

We start with the Republic of Texas.

Pay close attention now, because the facts I am going to give you–and they are facts–are not in any of the history books the winners have written for 150 years. Gentle smile…sounds like a good anniversary to celebrate, to me. Quite a few states would like the simple no-fault divorce the South asked for last time, but Texas has an advantage. We’ve only been living in sin all these years. That’s right: we weren’t married, or, to stop being colorful, Texas has never been a legal part of “those United States.”

1. The Republic of Texas is not, has never been, and could never have been admitted legally to the USA.
There is no provision in the Constitution for annexing or admitting another nation. True, there was an unconstitutional Bill drafted to do so, but it has been buried in committee for many a long decade and had a time clause in it. No one has ever dared bring it out for obvious political reasons.

2. Our flag does not fly at the same height as that of the US in recognition of the fact that we “were” once a sovereign nation or to advertise a failing amusement park, Six Flags Over Texas, but because we are still one, albeit under occupation since about six months after the rest of the South submitted. (I started to replace “one” with a more precise “sovereign nation,” but realized that our capitol, Austin, is also a failing amusement park. And we still went into the present deepening depression last and have felt the effects least.)

3. Our current Capitol building was constructed in 1939, and in the Great Rotunda is an enormous, splendid marble and brass mosaic that proclaims proudly “The Republic of Texas.” Once again, that wasn’t “history,” it is how a lot of us see the matter. Confederate General Albert Sydney Johnston reposes in the adjoining cemetery. That was when what you think of as the “Texas” flag was foisted upon us. The true Republic of Texas flag, the Burnett, a single golden star on a field of blue, flies in front of the ranch house and quite a few other places. I don’t tilt at windmills or I would prepare a brochure to hand yahoos who fly the US flag above the false flag on a single pole.

Hopeful look. Is anyone expostulating, “Now, Mrs. Traynham, all of that was long ago and isn’t relevant?”

How relevant are treaties–nations deal with each other by treaty, as you should have learned in Civics classes, if those are still taught–between the Republic of Texas and the US? How relevant is the decision of a Federal Judge? He takes himself pretty seriously and as far as I know he is still behind the bench over in West Texas. Is 2004 recent enough for you?! Yes, indeed, you may not have heard about it through the MSM, but in this century that splendid gentleman ordered the Feds “to cease and desist hostilities against the land and people of the Republic of Texas.” The Washington gang didn’t do it–regulations and taxes being very hostile, indeed, to say nothing of troops quartered on our soil–but they went back to D. C. a very unhappy bunch.

Some of you have read my remarks about the project I was engaged upon when I realized we had better shelve it because my analysis said that we were going to have either The Greater Depression or dictatorship before we completed the last two steps (three, if you count a wide-spread education effort) to free our nation. The RoT was it. I had reached the point of preparing a packet for volunteers covering the twenty top concerns of most citizens, and in every instance the answer is “Restore the Republic.” If it will amuse you, send me your question on how an independent Republic of Texas operating under a real, unsullied Constitution would improve the lives of all those who are honest, law-abiding, hard-working, and oppressed under current conditions.

Take heart, America, in how close we are. ALL that need be done is a Resolution from the Legislature calling for a public vote on the matter, and to conduct that vote. If we have a successful outcome Texas will cease to be a “for profit corporation” subsidiary to the for profit corporation known as the federal government. (Look them up in Dun & Bradstreet, along with the Federal Reserve.) We will revert instantly to the 1837 Constitution which has been updated very slightly and quite legally to allow suffrage for females and non-whites. Well over a hundred taxes and millions of pages of regulations will be rendered null and void immediately. (One slight problem is to keep the first Legislature elected and sworn in from restoring a bunch of in-crowd regulations wholesale and thoughtlessly. See Tex Norton’s upcoming article on how and why regulations are promulgated.)

The new President–who will not be the current governor unless he or she runs for that position and wins–will have a mansion and a salary of $10,000/year! The cream of the jest is that the new Legislature cannot raise salaries effective during their terms of office. We’ve got good stuff in our Constitution. For another example, it says simply that we have to come up with a plan to educate children, and it doesn’t say a thing about forbidding prayer or teaching fifth- graders the joys of sex. I’ve got a great plan for educating the children; I figure I can volunteer to be Secretary of Education and have all half dozen choices parents will have up and running in two weeks, at which point I will resign. No salary, no staff, set it up and let it work from home-schooling to on-line schooling to private schools to smiling sweetly and telling local neighborhoods that if they want traditional “free” neighborhood schools, by all means fund them out of their personal budgets no longer subject to income tax, sales tax, gasoline taxes, cigarette taxes, or property taxes. Nothing in life is free, people.

We have just a few possibilities for President that a lot of Texans (or “Texians,” in ancient parlance) might be excited about, including Dr. Ron Paul and a conservative writer who has a ranch not far from mine, a fellow named Chuck Norris. It could be that Ross Perot could make a comeback, I suppose…

If you look at the Red vs. Blue map you will discover–no surprise–that the Bluebellies hold the major cities and the area which has been invaded by Mexicans. The Red has everything else. Yes, we tend to vote Democrat but that is ancient rebellion against “the party of Lincoln.” In all save the big cities we’re a conservative, old-fashioned, pretty self-sufficient bunch. When I was a girl we called ourselves “conservative states-rights Democrats” rather than Republicans to differentiate ourselves from the “Progressives.”

We have a year before the next Legislature meets, and a useful pastime will be seeking candidates who are receptive to the notion of disentangling ourselves from an arrogant, oppressive government (two of them, actually), and starting over. Reclaiming our freedom is do-able. If I hadn’t thought so I wouldn’t have spent over a year working out details.

If we gain our independence again Texas will become, overnight, the ninth richest country in the world. Not only can we claim a 200-mile limit for oil exploration through international law, but we have a Supreme Court Decision that says the same thing–and the railroad commission controls such funds with schools having first call. There will be lots left over. We have deep water ports and nuclear facilities, tourism, wineries, and many miles of golden corn we won’t turn into Ethanol. We have plenty of gas and sweet, light crude left; the problem at present is Greenie legislation and transportation to refineries, which we also have. Texas has far more than our “fair share” of small farms and ranches, major universities, superb medical and vetinerary schools, and our own distinctive culture. There isn’t any good way for the US to pack up a few handy airbases when we toss their minions over our borders with jovial civility. We have the only independent power grid and several vast wind farms. We even have salt domes which hold “strategic reserves,” although my numerous oil friends tell me that it will be a miracle if 25% of the contents can be recovered, and Washington can try suing us in our courts if it wants first dibs on them.

Courts? Our Constitution calls for a series of common law courts. To simplify, all that is needed to try most cases is an elected Judge/Justice, half a dozen citizens gathered at random, no lawyers allowed, and the decision of the Jury is final. No lengthy waits, no incessant appeals…and one of my bright little ideas is that we outsource prisons for anything more complicated than sleeping it off over night in the drunk tank to Mexico. This would be extraordinarily cost-effective (not that the Republic of Texas Constitution calls for coddling criminals and terrorists, and it certainly does not mandate “Miranda” warnings), and most instructive. Mexican jails are exceptionally unpleasant places, that being the point of incarceration. Recidivism rates for the survivors should be very low; in addition being sentenced for crimes of violence will carry automatic revocation of citizenship if some of us persuade the rest. Let those who are inclined moan over lousy childhoods and evil companions elsewhere because real Texans believe we are responsible for our own actions. Golly…that would mean we didn’t need parole boards or parole officers, either, further reducing the payroll…and our stance will be that Social Security checks–but not taxes–will be enforceable contracts between the US and citizens of the Republic of Texas. Our Constitution calls specifically for minting our own gold and silver money–and the first serious country to revert to the gold standard will have a commanding role in world politics. Everything that needs doing can be funded handily by a 15% tax on non-resident corporations and a 10% tax for two years on those who apply for citizenship.

The breakup of any long-term relationship is at best painful and expensive. At worst it is messy and violent. The advantage the North held last time in terms of armaments was nothing compared to the current disparity between citizens and governments the Founding Fathers dreaded would come to be. Last time, until “we” had access to arms captured on the field of battle, fortunate Southerners used the accurate sniper rifles made by Whitworth, in England, while Lincoln had the precursor to the Winchester, went to the trials for the Spencer repeating rifle and got it into the field, as well as the Colt revolving rifle, Sharps made his sniper guns, and he had Dahlgreens and Parrot to cast canons. A descendant of Dahlgreens’ technology of exterior banding to strengthen barrels is in use currently. Texas is at the same apparent disadvantage multiplied many times.

Think long and well, fellow citizens, before deciding that we cannot, in conscience and in self-preservation, do other than echo Patrick Henry. IS life so dear and peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!

Those are the words which preceded “As for me, give me liberty or give me death.” It is highly unlikely that Pharoah will let the people go in peace this time, either. It is certain that should hostilities develop once again those who do not care one way or the other will be caught in the middle. Yes, I agree with Mr. Holland that secession is the most efficient way out of the fiat currency mess and many others, but I cannot see it as an “easy” way out. I must point out as calmly as one can say such a thing that a government which staged the tragedy at Waco under the code name “Operation Showboat” might well not eschew a homegrown version of Tienamen Square if it feels threatened.

Despite the strictures of Janet Napolitano and her ilk I do not regard myself as a Bible-thumping, gun-toting domestic terrorist. I love my country and I love our heritage. A primary reason I write is because those of us who can see most clearly what American can be do so from firm grounding in what America was. If left to my own devices I would raise cattle and goats, be happy, and do private charitable good works. All I have ever asked is laissez faire and common sense.

A diplomatic solution is at hand; all the Feds have to do is abide by the court order while we have our vote unsupervised and we will all see whether ending our version of apartheid could be a rousing success. There are at least face-saving legal grounds for acquiescing while Texas and Hawaii strike out on their own. Perhaps, given a fair vote, the preponderance of citizens will come down on the side of enormous, intrusive government. A lot of us have the nerve to put the issue to a test.

Still, I fear that the growing call for secession is on the order of nuclear deterrence, which thus far has deterred nothing but nuclear wars. Heavy sigh…we’re talking about a different sort of nuclear fission, the desire of the nucleus to throw off the useless atoms which have attached themselves to our core principles. I’m no Neville Chamberlain, but the wrath of those who hold the US Constitution prisoner must be taken seriously. That is a question for individuals, whether or not “we hold these truths to be self-evident.”

Sober regards,
Linda Brady Traynham

February 18, 2010

Linda Brady Traynham
  • Pickdog

    Beautiful LInda!

  • jerry from Oklahoma

    Wow, and thought I was the only one who ever read Mr. Douglas’ s Book “The South Was Right”. Since the victor in the” War of Northern Aggression” gets to tell the story and educate our children I always thought the truth would be buried for eternity. Our current problems are the exact same as they were then, except now not only do we support a system of inefficient corporations but our very own government is now fully controlled by these entity’s. Lovely Supreme court decision lately. We now have a government of the Corporation, not of the People. I have spent a lifetime like an old Charles Dickens spinster patiently Knitting. I can only hope that Russian was right in his recent prediction that the United States would start to fracture into regions just like his country and we can tell D.C. that they can cram that oblistic Washington Monument and all it represents straight up their arse. They had not right foisting a corporate America upon a free man. This little experiment in corporate governance with a fiat currency was doomed from the start and if you realize just how much debt has been piled upon our children they are nothing but slaves in a Capitalist Gulag. I hear some winds blowing and maybe, Just maybe I could “Regret that I have but one life to give for my country” and It has but a single star.

  • Philippe

    Where do I apply for citizen ship?

  • paledude

    Texans talk big but most wouldn’t be willing to shed their blood to make this happen, They just have to damn much stuff to give it up for an idea of freedom. Just keep smoking those peyote buttons linda and it will get better.

  • http://n/a James the Wanderer

    Excellent article. You need not worry too much about the Imperial Federal Government much longer, they are in the process of imploding; I suspect we will see it in the next fifty years. At that time, if Texas is prepared to act, they may well gain independence (again!) without having to fire a shot (or, at most, a few shots). The current debt load is unsustainable (a word I’m growing to deplore) and cannot be serviced with the entire savings of all Americans, although they will try (notice that Washington is taking comments on converting YOUR IRA’s and 401(k)’s to “annuities” that will be required to invest in government bonds to some extent?)
    Won’t work, won’t help, probably won’t even delay the Day of Reckoning that is coming to the Endless Debtors. We will see freedom again, many won’t survive the shock, and most will relearn what being human requires; an endless drive to build, save, plan and create that overcomes statist dreams of dominion and control.
    Keep it up; there are those who are listening. I was born in Texas (up towards Louisiana’s Shreveport) and may yet return there, if the circumstances permit. I may have to earn a grubstake overseas, though, in order to retire with some assets worth leaving behind. Cheers!
    james

  • jerry from Oklahoma

    I guess pale dude missed the story of the Texas suicide pilot crashing into the IRS this morning. Knitting……………………………….

  • jerry from Oklahoma

    I guess pale dude missed the story of the Texas suicide pilot crashing into the IRS this morning. Probably does not even realize Timothy Mcviegh was an ex ATF agent present at the gov’t incineration of the branch Davidians. Les revolucion’ hath many forms. Knitting……………………………….

  • jerry from Oklahoma

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/images/02/18/stack.letter.pdf?hpt=T1 enjoy.
    knitting……………………………………………………………

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Thank most of you for splendid replies, gentlemen, but let’s start with dissenter in the bunch. Paledude, are you a psychiatrist, a psychologist, a descendent of Eric Hoffer, or even someone who has ever visited Texas? You wrote, “Texans talk big but most wouldn’t be willing to shed their blood to make this happen, They just have to (sic) damn much stuff to give it up for an idea of freedom. Just keep smoking those peyote buttons linda (triple sic) and it will get better.” Peyote buttons are chewed, not smoked, and I have never tried them because nothing sounds like enough fun to ingest arsenic and then regurgitate before getting to what purports to be the fun part. I do not use mind-altering substances other than Whiskey & Gunpowder, books, and sensible quantities of healthful red wine. My mind is my most precious possession, although my darling Charles is a very close second–and that because if I ruined my mind we wouldn’t appreciate each other as we do any more. “Texas is the biggest and best” is our private national in joke; my favorite subset is “You bought the lunch, I’ll buy the Cadillacs.” Serious Texans don’t stand around fomenting war because we are busy being productive, patriotic, usually God-fearing citizens. Yes, we have our hotheads, and we certainly have more carpetbaggers and scalawags than we need, but we would much prefer the diplomatic solution that is available. We would accept a simple return to strict Constitutional principles. Check your history, Pale Dude. Even the anemic politically-correct versions long foisted on hapless youth reveal that whenever there is a fight for freedom three groups are there to lay their lives on the line: Southerners, Texans, and Irishmen. You can test that hypothesis easily: the all volunteer military has a preponderence of those reared in the lower SE quadrant of the US. Liberals claim loftily that this is because only the poor and poorly-educated are desperate enough to join. My resident head of two American Scottish clans adds that the Scots are always well-represented. He says he has seen estimates as high as 68%, although 40% is what crossed my mind. If you have any doubts, Google it. VMI, the Citadel, and Texas A&M vs. one military college in Connecticutt…Texans fought our own war with Mexico and we were with the South and fought on after dear, ill Bobby Lee believed an Illinois politician. He regretted that decision to the end of his life and said that had he known the reprisals the North would take he would have fought literally to the last man. (Poor Marse Robert wanted to support the Union but his principles and his belief in the Tenth Amendment wouldn’t let him.) The rift between us has never been solvable other than by separation or dictatorship. No sensible person WANTS war, and nowhere have I urged that course. I have just shown you a legal solution to the problem and the best chance I can see to establish one free nation built on the principles of freedom and true entrepreneurial capitalism. Washington would be wise to accept because a free Republic of Texas (and Hawaii, for that matter) would avoid the disastrous issue of secession and give a great many of the “trouble-makers” places to go. We would probably see the biggest migration since Tommy Thompson cut off welfare. LBT

  • dmpk6

    WELL SAID LINDA =)

  • rricher5

    I have become a fan of W&G and just read your well considered thoughts on secession. I have often heard about the “escape clause” used in whatever document that brought Texas into the USA. Do you know what document that was and if so is that clause still valid? A lot of legal mumbo jumbo could have voided our right. Is there a resource that people can access to further our understanding of this subject? Sorry to dump these questions on a fellow Texan but being brought up in a different state (naturalized in 1975) I didn’t have the advantage of Texas history. Over the years this has been on my mind that Texas supplies most of the energy used in the Northeast and receives very litte in return. I remember the energy problems in the ’80s when the slogan for many was “Let them freeze in the dark” . I think that sentiment has never gone away but simply held as yet another reason for us to go back to the original idea. The Republic of Texas would be a much better place to reside. I have only one tongue in cheek question: will my ‘naturalization be grandfathered”. Many thanks for whatever response you can provide.

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Phillipe, my dear:
    It is certainly possible to apply for citizenship of the Republic of Texas right now, and if you ask Gary to send me your e-mail address I will put you in touch with the appropriate individuals. A simpler solution is to move to Texas now. As I stated, we were last into the current depression and have been touched most lightly by it. About two months ago the ONLY place in Texas that reflected the national unemployment average was Brownsville; a quick glance at the map will give you an excellent answer to how this came to be. (Hint: Bronwsville is on a border.) The rest of the state is averaging half the official numbers.

    It is a bit premature at this time to renounce your US citizenship and I have not done so. I am treating your enquiry as a serious one; despite laboring under the same big government evils as the States, life outside the metropolitan areas is wonderful, and some even love HOU, SAT, and D/FW. As is true everywhere, the caterpiller in the salad is having sufficient capital to be able to relocate to the country–or a small town. As I always point out, those tend to be in perfect balance: if there is a need for goods or services someone else is already supplying them. Both business start up and employment opportunities are scant in the most desirable places to live. MDC and I are fortunate that each of us owned property. In a perfect world we could swap my more extensive acreage for an equal amount of land near Hamilton where we would both love to live. Our problem is that we cannot support our stock on the acreage he has, and even if we could sell my land in a disastrous market Capital Gains would consume too much of the proceeds to make this course viable, to say nothing of moving expenses. However, those of you who have sufficient capital to purchase a house (some beauties are on the market at greatly reduced prices) who can live on your pensions, even, could build a wonderful life in one of our placid backwaters. There ARE those who cannot be happy away from strip malls and freeways, but in Texas we think nothing of driving a hundred miles if we feel an urge for big city lights. Complacent laughter…MDC and I never do, but we don’t even bother to have satellite TV. VERY seriously, you retired folks consider our slightly to greatly lower cost of living and the 7 geographical regions, one of which is certain to suit your idea of beautiful terrain and climate. Whether or not we live to see TEOT-WAWKI, crunch the numbers and make some enquiries. It wouldn’t take much luck to find a small town you loved and discover that you can live on one pension and use the other for ranch or household help. Talk about affordable luxury?! A great–and deliberate–benefit of the choices that MDC and I made is that in ten years or so, if our children start saying, “Now, Mama, you’re getting older and we think you should live with one of us or go get a suite in an old folks’ home,” we will reply gently, “Kids, we are happy, healthy, and have two hands who fix delicious meals and do all of the housework and outside work. We can take our own blood pressure, the highest of which is 127/87 (Charles’.) Give this one up, because we’re going to die here at ripe old ages…and if you push it we’ll leave your inheritances to a home for cats.” THINK about that one! Not disinheriting beloved children, but the fact that “retirement communities” and “assisted living” average five to eight thousand/month. My modest pensions, alone, pay for live-in help. So long as no one gets senile dementia/ Alzheimer’s (stay away from aluminum and increase your vitamin E) staying home with servants is far more cost-effective; for that matter, so is checking into a good hotel with maid service and an on-call doctor. Even if the RoT is an unattainable dream, which I do not think it is, Texas is a great place to live. If we ever get to D&G it will also be one of the safest places to live. Mind, we don’t want or need any more Liberals, limousine or otherwise, but there is always a hearty Texas welcomefor those who can take care of themselves and want to adopt our distinctive Texas culture. Let me know if I can help in any way. Cordially, Linda

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Dear rricher5: My lengthy reply to Phillipe got trapped by the SPAM filter, but yes, “naturalization” will be grandfathered if we succeed. Our thoughts–as stated in the article–are that applicants for citizenship will be subject to a 10% tax (compare THAT to what the IRS takes!) for two years. Keep your nose clean for two years and the tax lapses. The contingent in favor of loss of citizenship for offenses that carry significant jail time may not prevail. As for your other question about our rights having been “voided,” no indeed!

    After 35 years you’re closing in on “old settler” status anyway. That only takes about 50 years! Where ’bouts are y’all in Texas? You know the drill–ask Gary for my e-mail (not hard to find in other ways), and you will probably get an invitation to visit the ranch, after suitable correspondence, and may be kind enough to invite us to see your operation. Cordially, Linda

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Phillipe, my dear:

    It is certainly possible to apply for citizenship of the Republic of Texas right now, and if you ask Gary to send me your e-mail address I will put you in touch with the appropriate individuals. A simpler solution is to move to Texas now. As I stated, we were last into the current depression and have been touched most lightly by it. About two months ago the ONLY place in Texas that reflected the national unemployment average was Brownsville; a quick glance at the map will give you an excellent answer to how this came to be. (Hint: Bronwsville is on a border.) The rest of the state is averaging half the official numbers.

    It is a bit premature at this time to renounce your US citizenship and I have not done so. I am treating your enquiry as a serious one; despite laboring under the same big government evils as the States, life outside the metropolitan areas is wonderful, and some even love HOU, SAT, and D/FW. As is true everywhere, the caterpiller in the salad is having sufficient capital to be able to relocate to the country–or a small town. As I always point out, those tend to be in perfect balance: if there is a need for goods or services someone else is already supplying them. Both business start up and employment opportunities are scant in the most desirable places to live. MDC and I are fortunate that each of us owned property. In a perfect world we could swap my more extensive acreage for an equal amount of land near Hamilton where we would both love to live. Our problem is that we cannot support our stock on the acreage he has, and even if we could sell my land in a disastrous market Capital Gains would consume too much of the proceeds to make this course viable, to say nothing of moving expenses. However, those of you who have sufficient capital to purchase a house (some beauties are on the market at greatly reduced prices) who can live on your pensions, even, could build a wonderful life in one of our placid backwaters. There ARE those who cannot be happy away from strip malls and freeways, but in Texas we think nothing of driving a hundred miles if we feel an urge for big city lights. Complacent laughter…MDC and I never do, but we don’t even bother to have satellite TV. VERY seriously, you retired folks consider our slightly to greatly lower cost of living and the 7 geographical regions, one of which is certain to suit your idea of beautiful terrain and climate. Whether or not we live to see TEOT-WAWKI, crunch the numbers and make some enquiries. It wouldn’t take much luck to find a small town you loved and discover that you can live on one pension and use the other for ranch or household help. Talk about affordable luxury?! A great–and deliberate–benefit of the choices that MDC and I made is that in ten years or so, if our children start saying, “Now, Mama, you’re getting older and we think you should live with one of us or go get a suite in an old folks’ home,” we will reply gently, “Kids, we are happy, healthy, and have two hands who fix delicious meals and do all of the housework and outside work. We can take our own blood pressure, the highest of which is 127/87 (Charles’.) Give this one up, because we’re going to die here at ripe old ages…and if you push it we’ll leave your inheritances to a home for cats.” THINK about that one! Not disinheriting beloved children, but the fact that “retirement communities” and “assisted living” average five to eight thousand/month. My modest pensions, alone, pay for live-in help. So long as no one gets senile dementia/ Alzheimer’s (stay away from aluminum and increase your vitamin E) staying home with servants is far more cost-effective; for that matter, so is checking into a good hotel. Even if the RoT is an unattainable dream, which I do not think it is, Texas is a great place to live. If we ever get to D&G it will also be one of the safest places to live. Mind, we don’t want or need any more Liberals, limousine or otherwise, but there is always a hearty Texas welcome for those who can take care of themselves and want to adopt our distinctive Texas culture. Please let me know if I can assist you in any way. Cordially, Linda

  • Walt Bombka

    Linda,
    As you know the subject is heartbreaking for me. I understand the sentiments and the reasoning behind them. As a sailor and as a grandson of sailors and airmen, whose mother’s maiden name is famous among the Irish and whose grandmother’s maiden name is a minor offshoot of a Scottish Clan, I regret I cannot claim Texas as my home but only as a part of the country I love. In the end the central theme of the new secessionists is no different from the old secessionists–fear of bankruptcy, so lets call it quiets and hope nobody comes round to collect the bill.

    I fear if we were to dismember ourselves we would only be easy pickin’s for the Chinese fascists and Islam-o-fascists.

    Always willing to learn more on a historical subject I did a a little research:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Annexation
    Annexation by joint resolution

    James K. Polk, a Democrat and a strong supporter of territorial expansion, was elected president in November 1844 with a mandate to acquire both the Republic of Texas and Oregon Country.[8] After the election, the Tyler administration realized that public opinion was in favor of annexation, consulted with President-elect Polk, and set out to accomplish annexation by means of a joint resolution.[9] The resolution declared that Texas would be admitted as a state as long as it approved annexation by 1 January 1846, that it could split itself up into four additional states, and that possession of the Republic’s public lands would shift to the state of Texas upon its admission.[10] On 26 February 1845, six days before Polk took office, Congress passed the joint resolution.[11] Not long afterward, Andrew Jackson Donelson, the American chargé d’affaires in Texas and the nephew of former president Andrew Jackson, presented the American resolution to President Anson Jones of Texas.[12] In July 1845, the Texan Congress endorsed the American annexation offer with only one dissenting vote and began writing a state constitution.[13] The citizens of Texas approved the new constitution and the annexation ordinance in October 1845 and Polk signed the documents formally integrating Texas into the United States on 29 December 1845.[14]

    Controversy over legality of annexation
    See also: Legal status of Texas

    The original controversy about the legality of the annexation of Texas stems from the fact that Congress approved the annexation of Texas as a territory with a simple majority vote approval instead of annexing the land by Treaty, as was done with Native American lands. After the United States and The Republic of Texas were unable to reach a Treaty agreement, Congress passed a Joint Resolution for Annexing Texas to the United States.[21] The Republic of Texas’ Annexation Convention then submitted the Ordinance of Annexation[22] to popular vote in October 1845 and the public approved the measure. This Ordinance of Annexation was submitted and approved by the House and Senate of the United States and signed by the President on December 29, 1845. While this was an awkward, if not unusual, treaty process it was fully accepted by all parties involved, and more importantly all parties performed on those agreements making them legally binding (see Contract Law). In addition, the United States Supreme Court decided in the case of DeLima v. Bidwell, 182 U.S. 1 (1901), that annexation by a joint resolution of Congress is legal.[23]

    Now if the kids at Wiki have it footnoted wrong or you take exception to their bibliography, I’m still open to being educated on the subject. My heart and mind may never be fully persuaded on the argument. I love my country like I love my woman–I want her whole and not cut or broken in pieces.
    Shalom,
    WJB

  • Walt Bombka

    Linda,
    As you know this subject is heartbreaking to me. As a sailor and the grandson of sailors and airmen, who’s mother’s maiden name is famous among the Irish and who’s grandmother’s maiden name is a minor clan among the Scots, I regret I cannot call Texas my home but only a part of the country I love. The central theme of the new secessionists is no different from the old secessionists–fear of bankruptcy:”lets make a break for it and we will get away from our debts”.

    I fear if we were dismembered we would only be easier pickin’s for the Chinese fascists and the Islam-o-fascists.
    Always willing to learn more on a historical subject I did a little extra reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Annexation
    Now if the kids at Wiki screwed up on their footnotes or you take exception to the bibliography, you know I’m always open to being educated. My heart and mind may never find the argument for persuasive. I love my country like I love my woman–I want her whole, not cut or broken into pieces.
    Shalom,
    WJB

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Walt, dear, you’re an honorary Texan because I say so–and because of your principles. You may be correct about the motivation of some, such as Mr. Holland, but I do not know or correspond personally with anyone who sees secession as a solution to monetary problems. This is a heartbreaking matter, because what “we” want is not the end of the USA. Some truly want an independent Texas, but I think that what most of us want with all our hearts is the America that once was. My sentence lost force because it wasn’t in rich text, so let me try again: we old-timers know what America CAN be because we know what she WAS. What we want is a return to strict interpretation of the Constitution and an end to the Welfare Nanny State. Ours is a cry from the heart similar to telling a beloved spouse “Check into rehab or I’m getting a divorce.” This is how bad it is for ME: if I were given my choice of being thirty years older or thirty years younger, I would choose to be older, even at the price of being near death. I could handle the Great Depression and WWII far better than I can cope with what I have lived through in the last twenty years and what I believe the outcome will be. Tears, and yes, I’m a half Irish, soft-hearted romantic….but when I am alone, working, and the Star Spangled Banner plays as a station goes off the air I stand up and put the correct hand over my heart. There is no one to see, but I truly love what my country stood for when I was young. The world NEEDS such an example as the USA was once. Getting rid of taxes and regulations is necessary to unleash true free market capitalism and revive precepts no longer taught and remembered by only a few. The principles of Thomas Jefferson were the yeast that raised a great nation that inspired the world, and they would work again. We are the last remnant of freedom in a world held captive by socialists and dictators, and we grow more impotent with every new ukase from Washington. Do you have a daughter? Think of her when she was young, enchanting, and filled with enormous promise…and then envision her as an old, disease-ridden, alcoholic, drug-addicted whore with a rap sheet that would reach from your desk to the street. Would that still be the daughter you loved? Of course not. IS America today still the USA you loved? Some claim the country is better than it was fifty years ago. Children grow up, Walt, and some of them do us great credit while others have disgusted us so thoroughly that the best we can hope for is never to see them again. If YOU have a better solution to restoring the USA we loved than shock tactics, please tell me what it is. I can’t see one better than “tough love.” Linda

  • CanadaNorth

    Well Linda, after reading the second paragraph, I was going to mention the tragedy of Waco, but of course you covered that too a bit later on .So you have a few eccentric religious people in a compound, so what? Let them be I say, we need diversity anyway. We have Hutterites and Mennonites here too with their distinctive dress code and close to the land and family ways. Mostly, they are good people, we kinda like them just the way they are. As I get older, I still treasure my northerly Canadian Peace River Area, away from big government and all that, just south of Alaska. But…. the cold weather makes me dream of a more southern clime where I could tinker on equipment and do other things all year ’round. So, instead of Mexico, why not the New Texas? Where do I sign up?

    The European Union sort of works, so why not a much looser North American Union, stick together as allies when needed but go separate ways for most of the daily governing duties. Oh, and last week I told of my Great Grandfather Danny Carey travelling when and where he wanted to in North America. Danny’s family came from County Cork, I suppose that would be of no surprise to you, would it? Freedom is in an Irish person’s blood, the English made a big mistake of severely mistreating the Irish way back then, the same as Washington has been treating Texans and southerners. Thanks for the education on the Republic of Texas. And thanks to Ron Holland too. Best Regards, CanadaNorth

  • Roger Stearns

    If any state could manage this, it would be Texas. Glad I own my little piece west of the Pecos. Of interest, the Lakota Sioux declared secession but no one really noticed. Native American reservations already enjoy sovereign state status through treaty but have never really leveraged that status. The Soviet Union had a practice of populating its various satellite states with troops from a different state. This was to insure that there were no loyalties when it came time to crack the whip. I wonder what percentage of our own armed forces are either from Texas or would be sympathetic to such a cause?

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Guys, forgive me for not being able to answer until I get over being furious with the nut case who lived about a hundred miles South and West of me. The one thing to be said for him was that he wasn’t a native Texan. Violence is NOT the answer, and the Middle East is probably laughing uproariously over, “Didja hear about th’ infidel who thought he could take out a 7-story building with a single engine Piper Cherokee?” I received Stack’s “suicide note/manifesto” from an alert friend who is also a radio talk show host. Stack whined at great length about how time after time he was all set to be successful but every time “they” (the government or the IRS) ruined everything. Well, gee, fellow, did it ever occur to you to have your taxes done professionally instead of moaning, “I didn’t think the $10,900 my wife made counted?” Are your wife and daughter better off because you set their home on fire, shamed them for the rest of their lives, and probably invalidated your life insurance? The loud left jumped in gleefully with over 2000 posts on Arianna Huffington’s statist rag, screeching joyously, “Tea-Baggers!” Oh, no, no one is going to call him a “terrorist” or a delusional, incompetent idiot. Far worse, they will call him a “conservative.” Well…I guess I can take time from my disgust and anger to comment that County Cork and County Clare are fine places, and I wouldn’t be surprised if we are related distantly, Canada North, which is a much more cheerful thought. Linda

  • Kenny Payne

    Great lesson. Now I know why my brother lives in Texas. I too remember the good ole USA. Keep up the great work. I hope Texas has the courage to break loose from the country. Take AR with it.

  • Walt Bombka

    Linda, Apologies for the double post. The first time it looked like it didn’t make it through the site’s spam filter. Devoutly prayed for progeny but the Creator’s answer has been not yet for a rather long time. So since my country is my only surrogate I will endeavor to explore another idea for enhancing our freedom. Since the central source of our freedom is our Constitution we will treat that as our “vitamin C”. More vitamin C of the Constitution will prevent the scurvy of tyranny from eroding the body politic. Now I had mentioned in a previous discussion that I was intrigued by the line in Article 1 concerning House districts representing 30,000 of the population. Apparently in the 1920’s the Congress legislated a strangle hold on the number of seats at the current 435. Little search turned up:
    http://www.thirty-thousand.org/
    These folks might be on to something. Walter Williams wrote a nice essay entitled “Political Monopoly Power” looking at the issue. I’m still puzzled why there was no Court challenge to it. However, I would propose to take it a step further by both territorial expansion (peacefully of course–life is all about how you negotiate!) and Constitutional Amendments to allow for the expansion of the Senate at a balanced rate. Little search brought up this site which give a good primer on current legal status of the islands that we call ours:
    macmeekin.com
    The Amendment part would be needed if we the people were willing to allow lets say D.C. and Puerto Rico full participation in the federal system without statehood but fully taxed of course–no free lunch. Statehood if they want, either way no more that 2 Senators each.
    Now in addition the Compact of Free Association model that has been used to redefine our territorial relationship with Micronesia could be further crafted to allow “little” republics to be fully represented within the “Greater” Republic:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_of_Free_Association
    This can be extended further. Lets say one of the Native Tribes under Treaty on Tribal Land already has a “republican form of government” for their Tribe wants to fully participate in the federal system we should have the confidence to let them have a House seat and 2 Senators as well.
    The kicker would be the Amendment that prevents the Congress from exempting itself from any law it passes. Okay a slow labourius process. However, we had the wisdom to repeal Prohibition. More representation would lead to more freedom. Sometimes thinking outside the box requires expanding the box.

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Dear Kenny: I hope it doesn’t take courage, just effort and (with apologies to Obama) “explaining” the plan correctly to residents. As I told Walt last night, this isn’t really about money. However, the biggest incentive many will see IS how much more money they would have if a hundred years of accumulated taxes and regulations are removed. I find property taxes particularly disturbing; our land and homes are not truly ours so long as they can be confiscated for failure to pay taxes–by the very people who set those taxes. The Constitution is very clear that wages shall not be taxed–and let’s don’t get into the shennanigans of an “amendment” that was never ratified properly. The worse the economy gets and the more onerous regulation grows the more people will take this idea seriously. ‘Fess up, now…before this article all of you thought I was just being colorful about the Republic, didn’t you? (Actually, Gary was the one who stuck that in.) Culture COUNTS. Bill Jenkins pointed out today that California is the world’s 8th largest economy, and it is bankrupt. Texas could be the world’s 9th largest, as noted above, with surpluses and incredible growth if money stayed in the hands of entrepreneurs and as capital for start up operations. Oh, gosh, put that way…think of all those who would want to move to Texas! A big hunk of California is already here. If we aren’t careful land prices will get even higher! On the other hand, there would be buyers with money…hmmm…perhaps the rest of you should be thinking of a new amendment to repeal the income tax. I think it only takes 15 or 20 years to get one adopted…Thanks for writing. Linda

  • Steve Grekko

    Linda, I really enjoy your writing. Here I am in Georgia, and I think…maybe I should have moved to Texas instead. It’s been an interesting day. As Gerald Celente must be thinking, someone from Texas fired another shot in the Revolution today, two counting your article. The first was Joe Stack, who flew his Piper into an IRS office down in your Republic. I can’t believe that some liberal “newspeakers” are trying to label him a terr’ist! Disgruntled, YES! Terr’ist…NO! I can’t think of anyone nicer to fly a plane into than the jackboots at the IRS, or maybe even the TSA. Good luck down there with your quest for freedom. Know that there are many in Georgia that would love to establish diplomatic relations with your Republic, soon as we can get that darn boot off of our necks.

  • http://www.theonedollarbusiness.com Steve

    Linda, another great piece, but be careful what you wish for. Maybe just maybe Arnold in Calif. should take the advice, shut down the schools and those who really want an education will either homeschool or pay for it. Unfortunately that scenerio would be the burning of L.A. If you fire all the babysitters the kids will have nothing to do and gangs would rule the city.

  • BigDaddio

    Linda, kudos on some well articulated ideas, and bringing the problem, and the SOLUTION into focus. I for one, agree with you, and want to help get this moving. I know there is a local election in another month. In your mind, who is the candidate of choice starting at the top, to put this into motion? I am a firm believer that we need to remove the special interest groups, and those tied to Washington. Who do we need to help get into office?? Has anyone approached the gubnatorial and legislative candidates to determine their position on this issue? Time is wasting, and the longer we wait, the worse it will get.

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Dear Steve (Grekko):

    You Jaw-juh boys are such fire-eaters! Calm down, Sugar, think beautiful thoughts, and don’t go stirrin’ up Janet Napolitano and th’ boys in black.

    I neither claim nor applaud J. A. Stack. Attacking civilians is not the American way, and we are all Americans even if some of us would prefer to make our own decisions and conduct personal and state affairs under strict Constitutional rules. Stack has already provoked thousands of unfair cries of “Tea Baggers!” Violence harms all of us. Diplomacy first, always.

    Yes, the thought of freedom is heady, but you would not enjoy coming to the attention of humorless bureaucrats and our task has become harder, not easier, because one man acted irresponsibly. It’s one thing to tell jokes like “What do you call a thousand lawyers at the bottom of the sea?” (a good start), but another entirely to foment insurrection. I like my readers to stay out of jail! Thanks for writing. Linda

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Thanks for writing, Big Daddio and other than strictly local candidates all I know is that Deborah Menendez, who is running for Governor, is spoken of very highly for her libertarian principles. She probably can’t win, but in this case I don’t really see much to choose between Rick Perry and Kay Bailey Hutchinson (Pity. Long ago Kay was one of the good ones.) A big vote for the minor candidate might be an eye-opener, and we can suppose that she will have much of the ethnic vote that doesn’t vote D automatically. No, that isn’t “racism,” it is a simple statement of human nature. Wry look. We have already seen what comes of voting for race and rhetoric, and his name is BHO. We can’t go very far wrong voting against virtually all incumbants, and if I didn’t have anything else to go on I might well choose on whoever had the fewest signs and had sent out no campaign literature! This is experience speaking, because both signs and mailers are very money and labor intensive, and commercials require a very big warchest. Makes sense that someone who doesn’t have union and big money backing might be more to our tastes, and if we elect a few eccentrics, so much the better. Thanks for your excellent reminder that we need to get out of our entrepreneurial towers and start working out who to run next year. Oh…there should be voters pamphlets available, too, with descriptions written by the candidates, for what those may be worth. Another pretty good guideline for many years has been to vote against anyone endorsed by the local papers. Hope these ideas help a bit…and why aren’t you running yourself? Cordial regards, Linda

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Dear “plain” Steve: Probably I should go write an article on how school systems should be run! I think I will, thanks for the inspiration. If money were no option most of us know where we would send our kids: the best private school in town. Home-schooling is the best option to my way of thinking IF Mom can stay at home and really teaches. There are two basic problems, and money won’t solve either. The first is the illiteracy rate which has been rising for sixty years. The answer is “phonics and nothing but phonics,” and should we manage to restore the Republic I will donate my private system. I can–and do, when teaching privately (and gratis!)–explain everything there is to know about WHAT reading really is and HOW we really do it. It takes about an hour and a half on tape and takes students through the ten rules of reading and about 250 sound combinations. The other is textbooks. This may sound nuttier than usual, but let’s pull out the 1870 edition of Webster’s Blue Backed Spellers (also entirely phonetic based) and the curricula and textbooks used in the Fifties! Well, yeah, the kids wouldn’t learn about political correctness, but they would learn what WE did, which was far more than the current basic college degree. MUST quit or the SPAM filter will get me! Regards, Linda

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Dear Steve: I went and wrote the article on how I would structure matters if I were the Secretary of Education anywhere; it should be up early next week. I can never understand how we sat idle while the Statists manipulated matters to where kids aren’t even required to be polite and let other students learn in peace. Discipline? They never heard of it other than as a way to get teachers fired. Back in the old days if you got sent to the Principal you were in trouble–but you were in far worse trouble when you got home. There was very little “child abuse” in the meaning most of us assign to that term, possibly because incipient trouble-makers got swatted on their little rears the first time they bit another child or kicked an animal or sassed an adult. Ah…I am SUCH a Neanderthal. Perhaps one dire solution is to let them burn their schools and kill each other and jail any participants left standing. And don’t let them out. Why should the law-abiding go in fear of the violent and lawless? Obviously, they shouldn’t.

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Hi, James! Long time no hear! I fail to be calmed by the thought of the Imperium imploding 50 years from now since both I and my children are likely to be dead. The Feds will be lucky if it lasts another five because it simply cannot be paid for much longer. As for Texas regaining independence, discussing the benefits of one truly free Republic built on free enterprise is where we start. (And I still suggest it is better to take your lumps now and avoid being forced into a GRA.) BEAUTIFULLY put: “We will see freedom again, many won’t survive the shock, and most will relearn what being human requires; an endless drive to build, save, plan and create that overcomes statist dreams of dominion and control.” I always have at least one book and one project and I even think it is worth our time to earn less than a dollar an hour bottle-feeding baby goat girls 4 times a day, that being how we turn $50 breeding stock into $250 dairy goats who are bonded to people. Hurrah! We’re down to 3 times a day, and in a month can go to twice a day. The little goats dote on us and are very entertaining, but there is something so satisfying about increasing value with our minds and labor. Go get rich in the -Stans! Regards, Linda

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Dear Roger: I both hope and pray that we never find out if our armed forces will fire on peaceful citizens, although some are still being given questionnaires on that subject. If it came to martial law some would shoot into quiet crowds, more would not, and a large segment including Law Enforcement would go home quietly to care for their families. Nobody wants a war! Remember about 1970 when the forebears of the Nicotine Nazis asked if we minded if there were just a few places we didn’t smoke? We’re nice folks, so we agreed, and now they tax and hound us out of most buildings. What if there were just ONE state/nation/republic that abided by the Articles of Confederation and free-market principles? That is the danger the dream of the Republic holds for the Statists, the number of people who ask only that. 14% are hard-core Left, and about that many are probably lawless or addicted hopelessly to the welfare state. Even in a true Jeffersonian agrarian republic , not all would become wealthy landowners because some have more drive or assets than others…but if ever there were a dream which DID come true for a while and could be true again, this is it. It is very true that Texas has our own charming, distinct culture despite having been diluted by outsiders, but what Texas has that counts most is legal grounds to go our way in peace. It is not necessary to have hostilities, only to abide by the order of a federal court. Is there a dream more uniquely American than to be allowed to pursue happiness in peace? Statists scream about “hostile work environments.” So far as many of us are concerned their policies provide an environment hostile to life and success. We don’t want a fight, we want what is ours by right. We want them to take their whips and regulatory chains outside our borders and leave us in peace. The Judge said it beautifully: “Cease and desist hostilities against the land and people of the Republic of Texas.” California is statism run to its logical conclusion. The dream of a new Republic is attainable if we work at it. We have learned from 175 years of legislative and social mistakes. Read the 1836 Constitution. There isn’t much in there! Most of the “crimes” in America were created by politicians. I have a question: just when WILL there be “enough” laws? The founding fathers never meant for Congress to churn them out by the thousands for 235 years.

  • oldmanriver

    Linda,
    You are half Irish…I knew it!. Somewhere was said about the 3 most willing to fight for freedom Texans, Irish and someone else. Hahaha, why did you limit it to freedom. Scotts-Irish need no reason to fight and if they are bored they will invent one. People of Celtic decent never saw a cause they wouldnt die for.

  • http://n/a James the Wanderer

    Oh, I don’t think the Imperium will last fifty years either, that was an “outer limit” guess. Although, large systems do possess considerable inertia, which may explain why it’s taken this long to sink this far. A trillion dollar a year deficit should do the trick, though, probably in less than five years, as you say.
    The -Stans? Possibly, possibly not, it’s all in the cards that come up in a year or so (when I theoretically graduate again). I’m kind of hoping for New Zealand, after seeing those Tolkien movies the countryside looks so beautiful. However, I’m an engineer, so like Dad we go where the jobs are – unless we make our own. Dad went to Saudi Arabia when I was 18, kind of forced me to grow up when my Mom went to join him a year later. He was building a hospital and an airport near Riyadh for the Saudis; didn’t exactly get rich, but made enough to retire and keep going since the mid-80’s. No telling what I might wind up doing similar, or where!
    GRA’s will be a nightmare; I’m looking at moving one of my IRAs into Perth Mint Certificates, hopefully that’ll be too much trouble to seize. I hope to have at least a little left when the economy sinks, we’ll just have to see. I probably don’t have enough chips to be worth taking, but with this bunch you never know, I think they’d steal everyone’s eyeteeth “for the children”, or possibly “so that every American can have health care”. Damn liars!
    Good to hear from you; keep the faith (and the dairy goats) strong!
    Cheers!
    james

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Interesting letter, thanks, James. Goats–particularly goats that can be milked easily–have been prized possessions since man first domesticated animals. They reproduce at least yearly (and can do so every 6 months but that is very hard on the doe), and provide some combination of milk, cheese, meat, or hair depending upon the breed. They make splendid pets other than thinking they should live in your house and get in your lap, and can live over 20 years, breeding for at least a dozen of those. A good goat will feed the twins she almost invariably produces after a single at her first breeding AND give you a gallon of rich milk for 300 days, more after the kids are weaned. Goats are very good things and if we had any sense we would be giving the Afghans and the Iraquis goats instead of bunker busters and candy bars. Sure, this sounds odd, but a goat is REAL wealth in that part of the world, and the simplest solution to the problem is to build a middle class…which we could do easily and inexpensively by dispensing pregnant goats! Nubians would surely do well and even the humble Boer meat goat would be a blessing. If I were going to do it I would set up a lottery system iin each province or even hamlet, charging whatever their smallest coin is. No, we aren’t trying to raise money, the goal would be to increase wealth in terms the locals valued AND make it possible to pay informants discretely. It would be dangerous to have to account for American dollars or even large amounts of local currency, but “the goat, Capitan? I won it in the crazy Amis lottery! What a fine thing this is for my family. Now my ugly daughter has a dowry!” The more people blathering about increased family security and position AND the generosit of the fine Americans, the better. A doe to produce meat runs about $35. A finely-bred dairy goat will cost $150-$250. If we’re going to bribe people we should do it with items they value. I can’t be bribed, exactly, but I always welcome gifts of books and big, gaudy hunks of gold. Everybody likes something, and you can’t go wrong in the Middle Eat with the gift of a goat! Regards, Linda

  • Jim

    Jim Bowie, Louisiana native, was at the Alamo and maybe once you Texans get the ball rolling I’ll drag my California carpetbagging Louisiana native asp there too. Lord knows there’s nothing but a job in this God Forsaken state to hold me.

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Jim, have you been in the “golden” state too long?! Thanks for the opportunity to explain what carpet-baggers and scalawags are. A carpet-bagger was a poor Yankee adventurer who scraped up enough money to get to the South with his few belongings in a small bag made of old carpet rather than costly leather. His plan was to see what sort of pickings he could find toadying to the Yankee overlords and taking advantage of punitive laws on Southerners. Ooooh, he loved those tax sales. A scalawag is NOT a lovable scamp. “Quisling” is fairly close. Bill Clinton is a Scalawag and so is Al Gore; they side with the enemy for personal game. Jimmy Carter was just dumber’n dirt. Strom Thermond was a fine South’n gentleman. If you have never read Allen Drury’s “Advise and Consent” series I have always supposed he modeled Seabright Cooley after Strom. GREAT series, all except the last book. As for you, Jim, don’t you know that part of Louisiana ie OURS? The boundary marker is still there, and it isn’t a river. Y’all come when you’re ready. Write again when you’re homesick. Linda

  • steverino

    I’m sure glad everybody agrees it’s gonna be a republic and not just another utopia. Just figuring out the rules for the vote for secession sounds like a civil war. I’m not as confident about that vote as you are, Linda. I think you and the other ranchers like Chuck Norris and Ron Paul are going to have your hands full trying to out-vote the people who would lose their food stamps if you said “Happy Trails”. Besides, I’ve seen Chuck Norris on the campaign trail. At the risk of getting my — kicked: not good. But, if you can disenfranchise enough poor people AND stop just a few of the illegals from voting AND get Diebold to “gather the voting data” AND some “boys from Chicago” to interpret same—–anything could happen!

    I think there may be more to the story than you have had space to touch upon in your brief and concise analysis, Linda. Basically, I think that, after being invaded by Mexico for the last 35 years, straight, you guys have had it ‘up to here’ and will try ANYTHING for just a chance to fight back! Good luck with that!

    This has also helped me understand Timmy McVeigh, too! How upset he was about what happened in Waco, and how civilized he was not to even try to blow up anything in Texas!

  • Jim

    Dude you got that right – avoided becoming a fruit but swiftly transforming to nut. At the risk of poetic license, Linda, “You the Man.” Dads from Tyler and if Part of LA. was part TX I guess that makes me an honorary Texan. Go Horns – Except in cases where their playing my Tigers, of course.

  • http://www.thetexasring.com Linda Brady Traynham

    Steverino…I don’t think I’m following you, so I’ll just comment on what I think I do understand. It would never occur to ME to attempt to “disenranchise” anyone. Nowhere have I advocated Jim Crow laws, although I certainly resent voter fraud on the Statist side and attempts to turn illegal aliens into voters through “amnesty.” If the vote were held tomorrow–which it could not be–too few would understand the issues for more than 40-60, I think. In order to win this one we’re going to have to explain the whats and whys. We already know Statists, unions, and hangers-on will detest the idea. The difference is that we don’t want them to be forced to live under our ideas of proper governance. There are 49 states to which anyone who doesn’t like the 1836 Constitution can move but there isn’t ANYWHERE those of us who find socialism repugnant can go. If there were I would have relocated long ago. Tommy Thompson demonstrated that those content to live on “welfare” for generations both can and will go elsewhere if they are not supported by taxes. “Promoting the general welfare” is a clause in the PREAMBLE to the Constitution explaining why the rules were promulgated, not an order to support some to the detriment of others. What price “equal treatment before the law?” TJ and the boys could be as bad as anyone else about slipping into lofty, meaningless rhetoric which can be misconstrued or twisted deliberately. Oh…I guess I’ll go write an article on “who is a farmer?” Short version: AGRIBIZ gets handouts; ordinary people don’t, but they are restricted for the benefit of huge corporations. Sure there are subsidies for peanut farmers–some peanut farmers. I am FORBIDDEN to plant peanuts, a nitrogen-fixing legume, to enrich my soil and provide vitamin rich forage for my livestock. I cannot even buy the seeds without a permit–which I can’t have. Is it any wonder I want to turn the clock back to a time when sensible, ordinary activities were not criminalized?

  • Ambi

    Very insightful article and comments.

  • Vernon

    Some insightful commentary on the idea of secession, by Tom Baugh. The articles to read are titled “A Nation Without A Country”.

    http://www.webwarrioronline.com/index.php/component/search/Baugh?ordering=newest&searchphrase=exact&limit=20

    His basic comment is that a secession would be ruthlessly crushed unless it happened during a time of national crisis when the Feds would have their hands full and not be able to respond. Interesting reading.

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