Gary Gibson

Looks like the U.S. government dodged a bullet today, thanks to the FBI…

Rezwan Ferdaus of Massachusetts was arrested this morning. He was accused of plotting to blow up the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol using remote-controlled aircraft armed with explosives.

According to the FBI, they’ve thwarted another dastardly plot. Except that once again it seems to be a plot they themselves helped hatch…

The public was never in danger from any of the explosives, various news sources tell us, because the explosives were at all times under the control of the FBI. It was the bureau who delivered the explosives to Ferdaus…or at least what the patsy believed to be C-4 plastic explosives, six fully automatic AK-47 machine guns and grenades.

It was (once again) the FBI that through one of its 15,000 or so informants goaded Ferdaus along, essentially double-daring him to blow something up.

The FBI has led another Muslim into making the bureau look like it’s effectively stopping terrorist acts.

Are we mad? Are we protesting the arrest of a man who clearly wanted to harm innocents?

Far from it. We merely question how dangerous this man would have been considered if he hadn’t been prodded along and supplied by federal cops trying to look useful in the war on terrorism.

This is what the FBI has been doing since Sept. 11. “Pre-emption,” “prevention” and “disruption” have been the watchwords in the bureau’s counterterrorism efforts. In practice, this has meant using spies in the Muslim community to find terrorist sympathizers and grow them into potential terrorists under the FBI’s expert guidance.

FBI agents assign an undercover operative to pose as an extremist and approach the targeted patsy. The FBI then provides the plots, the means and the materiel. Then they make their arrest. Then they tell us what a fantastic job they’re doing protecting our freedoms.

We suppose you could argue that these patsies could have been goaded into action by actual terrorists if only the terrorists had found them first. But that’s not what happened. The FBI found them and sent them on their way. We suppose if we’re arguing what-ifs, we could also point out that these patsies wouldn’t want to do harm to the U.S. government or its subjects if the U.S. would cease invading other countries in a shameless display of imperial overreach.

So here’s how it works. Fear is used as an instrument by the state to control its population — through legally approved wiretaps and other listening devices — and to create a basis for the argument that we need to continue the war on terror.

As Addison put it yesterday in the 5 Min. Forecast:

“In a perverse development, this will have the effect of padding Pentagon budgets and contractors’ bottom lines, as Washington creates more enemies it then has to knock down.”

What this ultimately achieves is continued monetary support for friends in high places — like defense contractors, in this case.

But today’s battlefield looks different from even the one we knew just 10 years ago. And this shift is creating new winners and losers in the race for DOD dollars. The MQ-1 predator program has cost the Defense Department almost $2.4 billion to develop. And each new predator costs about $4.5 million.

Capturing terrorists leads to more fear about finding terrorists in our midst. The governments response is…more wars, more money spent and new innovations created to kill terrorists.

Again Addison:

“This is the logic behind the staggering growth in the use of pilotless drone aircraft. To date, the U.S. government has used them to carry out attacks in six countries: Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and Libya.

“Now the Pentagon is building what The Washington Post describes as a ‘constellation of bases’ to support routine drone strikes in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The aim? ‘To create overlapping circles of surveillance in a region where al-Qaida offshoots could emerge for years to come,’ U.S. officials said.

“The number of U.S. drones has exploded 100-fold in a decade. They number more than 6,000 today. Drone strikes that numbered in the single digits in 2007 numbered 118 last year.”

We here at the Whiskey Bar are not happy with our government’s heavy-handed response to these external threats — real or fabricated. Given the increase in the number of drones, strikes and target-rich environments, this is a trend that isn’t going to change anytime soon.

Sincerely,

Gary Gibson

Gary Gibson

Gary Gibson is the managing editor for Whiskey and Gunpowder. He joins the Whiskey staff as a long-time fan and reader of both Whiskey and Gunpowder and the Daily Reckoning. A graduate of Fordham University, Gary now spends his days reading about and writing on limited government, sound money, personal responsibility and resource investing.

  • Pat Riehl

    I’m stunned by your closing statement. You seriously believe it’s YOUR government? Since when?

  • Roger Stearns

    Remember Ruby Ridge!

Recent Articles

How to Profit From the “Cycle of Hype”

Greg Guenthner

Lose your shirt in 3D printing stocks this year? Don’t kick yourself. You’re not alone. (Okay, kick yourself a little if it’ll make you feel better.) You need to make sure you don’t lose your 3D-printed shirt in the next tech craze. Because there will be a next time. Look, it’s really not your fault if you got taken for a ride on 3D stocks. Greg Guenthner has more...


From Creditopia to Utopia

Richard Duncan

Our friend Richard Duncan believes the U.S. economy requires credit growth to survive. Here, you’ll see what he thinks will happen if the U.S. doesn’t continue expanding credit. You’ll also find exclusive footage we shot in the Daily Reckoning’s studio explaining how the U.S. could lose it’s global dominance… and how programs like Social Security or Medicare could go bust...


Video
Why Democracy Won’t Survive the New Depression

Richard Duncan

The hum of the printing presses and the steady drip of cheap credit over the past five years made it easy to believe the U.S. economy was in a true recovery. But what happens when the excess liquidity begins to dry up?


Don’t Blame Obama (He Has No Power)

Chris Campbell

The Americans who voted for Obama were expecting some big changes. But, six years later, the government he acquired has only spied harder, the drones have flown lower, and the weapons have gotten bigger. But don’t blame Obama. Read on…


Your Personal Gold Standard

James Rickards

All paper currency has a shelf life. It could be 5 years or 500 years, but at some point, the value of any paper currency eventually reaches zero. That's why, for centuries, people have turned to one shiny metal to safeguard their personal store of wealth. And, as Jim Rickards explains, you still have that option. Read on...