Uncle Sam Grows Garbage Weed — Profit From the Good Stuff

Here’s an interesting fact about weed: All marijuana used in government funded research is grown and harvested at the same location at the University of Mississippi.

The grow operation at Ole Miss is partnered with The National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA) — The same institute that states on their website that marijuana leads to “lower life satisfaction, poorer mental health, poorer physical health, more relationship problems.”

So what does NIDA want with a 12 acre plot of marijuana?

The government is interested in exploring methods of growing marijuana with different levels of THC for various medical treatment purposes. All while denouncing it on a federal level.

But in a shocking (shocking!) twist, it turns out government grown pot isn’t that great.

Below, Ray Blanco explains why you don’t want to buy your weed from Uncle Sam.

Regards,

Amanda Stiltner
for The Daily Reckoning


Uncle Sam Grows Garbage Weed — Profit From the Good Stuff

By Ray Blanco

Earlier this month, something huge happened.

It’s something we’ve been waiting for.

Don’t go buying weed from Uncle Sam…

No, not for the reasons you’d think.

Turns out, his stuff isn’t as good as the pot produced by the private sector.

Currently, cannabis is produced for scientific research by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) — in many states, it’s the only allowed source of marijuana for research, if research is allowed at all.

But according to Bloomberg and a just-published study in Nature, government weed is vastly inferior to what’s being produced legally in many states right now.

“New research finds that government-produced cannabis offers fewer variations and a lower concentration of cannabinoids than marijuana sold by dispensaries in states where the drug is legal,” says the Bloomberg story.

The not-so-surprising news comes from a study of nearly 3,000 samples performed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and Sleep Hill Labs Inc.

“Federal pot has been criticized in the past for not looking or smelling like cannabis both by researchers and professional critics.”

That’s not just a funny anecdote — the weakness of government pot has some big implications. For instance, giving researchers access to weak or ineffective marijuana masks some of the potential benefits of using pot for treating diseases.

And NIDA samples are difficult to get ahold of in the first place.

But we’re witnessing a shifting tide in public sentiment for pot right now. In fact, on April 20, the nation’s unofficial marijuana holiday, a Quinnipiac University poll showed that U.S. voter support for marijuana has hit a new high.

(No pun intended.)

There’s a very interesting postscript to the Nature study, too…

Both government-produced weed and illegal cannabis were inferior in THC content to state-legal marijuana strains sold by dispensaries. That’s an important validation that the trend we’re seeing in the legal pot space is contributing to real advances in the science behind the plant.

As more potent state-legal pot hits laboratories, expect to see breakthroughs in marijuana continue to ramp higher — and, along with them, opportunities in pot stocks.

Exciting times are ahead.

To a bright future,

Ray Blanco
for The Daily Reckoning

The Daily Reckoning