Paddle Yourself to Destruction?

One of faces I’m always happy to see at the TED conference every year is Dr. Kevin Stone, an orthopedic surgeon from San Francisco. He’s something of a legend among TED folks who’ve had need to use his services.

One longtime TEDster, a close friend of mine who had a failing knee (and a benign tumor next to it that other physicians had failed to discover) and who lives in New York, recently went to see him. Yes, she went all the way to the other coast to consult with him. Then she returned to spend some time under his knife. Miraculously, she felt almost no pain after the operation, took nothing stronger than over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicine and healed perfectly. Her limp is entirely gone.

That sort of report from Stone’s patients isn’t unusual. I’m not trying to build his business — it is already overwhelming. He’s not cheap, and he doesn’t take insurance. But I know who I will go to when my time comes, as it does for almost anyone who is active and lives long enough.

The good doctor writes a column that’s posted on his website and is published in the San Francisco Examiner, but otherwise, he gets little attention. I tend to follow the column because his advice for preventive behavior can be enlightening. And how much good preventive advice on orthopedics is out there? Almost none.

I’m passing on his most recent column in the link below because I, like many people, have been caught up in the paddle board boom, and I was surprised to learn how many injuries are arising from it, especially among those who race their boards. As Dr. Stone eloquently points out, trying too hard on a paddle board kind of defeats the whole idea of its serenity and is likely to create all kinds of havoc with your body.

Click here to read the article.

To your health and wealth,

Stephen Petranek
for The Daily Reckoning

Ed. Note: Get the top investment trends for 2015 in medicine and technology from the former head of the most popular science magazine in the world. Simply sign up for our Tomorrow in Review e-letter for FREE right here. Don’t miss out. Click here now to sign up for FREE.