Life Expectancy Shoots up Worldwide

A study in Britain’s medical journal The Lancet reveals that life expectancy is rising around the world at a remarkable rate, even in some undeveloped nations. In the last 25 years, average life spans have increased by more than six years, or an extra year of life for every four years that pass.

The study attributes part of the increase to treatments for HIV and AIDS reaching more people, advances in treatments for malaria and advances in nutritional information, as well as better health care for expectant mothers and infants. Since 1990, when the average age on Earth for humans was measured at 65.3 years, life spans for children born now have risen to 71.5 years worldwide.

Elderly man on a train

People in this nation live far longer than those in any other country.

Variations can be extreme, with Lesotho registering in at 42 years average life expectancy and Japan setting the upward record at 73.4 years. Researchers said more than half of the differences discovered between countries is due to fertility rates, income and education levels and age of the population.

The top 10 countries where people live the longest, in order: Japan, Singapore, Andorra, Iceland, Cyprus, Israel, France, Italy, South Korea and Canada. The 10 lowest: Lesotho, Swaziland, Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Afghanistan, Chad, South Sudan and Zambia.

The 10 greatest causes of shortened life spans around the world are heart disease, lung infections, stroke, back and neck problems, highway injuries, diarrhea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, birth complications, HIV and AIDS and malaria.

To your health and wealth,

Stephen Petranek
for The Daily Reckoning

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