Alexander Green

Here’s a handy way to know when to sell your investments: everyone is talking about them.

There is an obvious corollary to knowing what to sell. If you want to know what to buy, consider what no one is talking about.

And that brings me to investing in Japan…

From a high near 40,000 in 1989, the once-mighty Nikkei 225 – the equivalent of our S&P 500 – fell over 80% and hit a 27-year low early last year. It’s still more than 70% below the highs of 21 years ago.

The main culprit – aside from a real estate bubble that made the one here in the United States look bush-league – was misguided government policies. Japan waited too long to clean up its ailing banking system and spent trillions on public works projects that simply weren’t needed.

However, Japan has a new government that has promised to shrink the country’s massive bureaucracy and cut wasteful public spending. It also intends to end more than 20 years of economic stagnation by cutting taxes and focusing on small and mid-sized businesses.

Japanese stocks have rallied off the lows of 10 months ago. In fact, the Tokyo Exchange is one of the world’s best-performing bourses so far in 2010.

But it’s still among the cheapest and most unloved in the world. Virtually no one is enthusiastic about Japanese stocks.

Alexander Green

Alexander Green is the Investment Director of The Oxford Club. A Wall Street veteran, he has over 20 years experience as a research analyst, investment advisor, financial writer and portfolio manager.

He is also Chairman of Investment U, an Internet-based research and education service with over 300,000 readers. He currently writes and directs the twice-weekly Oxford Portfolio Update e-letter and three short-term trading services: The Momentum Alert, The Insider Alert and The New Frontier Trader. Mr. Green is also the author of The New York Times bestseller The Gone Fishin? Portfolio: Get Wise, Get Wealthy...and Get On with Your Life.

  • john_slock

    I hope you have a better fundamental case for Japanese stock than just “nobody’s talking about them”. Nobody is talking about Burma real-estate, used refrigerators or pine trees either, but that doesn’t automatically make them good investments.

Recent Articles

Extra!
6 Reasons You’ll Love Being a Late-Stage Investor

Matthew Milner

When investing in a private company, there are two kinds of investors: early-stage and later-stage. And while early-stage investors have more upside potential, they're also exposed to far more risk. Today, Matthew Milner explains how you can be a successful later-stage investor, and still make great gains, with much less risk. Read on...


Video
How to Predict an Economic Collapse

Kate Incontrera

In his recently released book, A Viennese Waltz Down Wall Street, Mark Skousen gives the Austrian School's take on what triggered the 2008 financial crisis - and why you should be wary of the artificial boom that's driving the recovery.


Laissez Faire
Why Heartbleed Will Change the Internet as You Know It

Mike Leahy

The Heartbleed bug is a massive security flaw that could put you and your personal information at risk. And while there are things you can do to limit the damage, you haven't yet seen the ramifications of this security disaster. The Internet in the post-Heartbleed world won't look like anything you've seen before. Mike Leahy explains...


Big Opportunity in the “Baby Bakken” Oil Field

Matt Insley

As the U.S. "shale gale" nears its 10th birthday, it appears the America energy renaissance has outlived its critics. Still, it's natural to wonder whether all the big gains are behind us. Today, Matt Insley reveals the newest shale hotspot, and explains why there's still plenty of opportunity left in the U.S. energy boom. Read on...


Maestro
The Real Reason the US Media Hates Vladimir Putin

Marc Faber

The U.S., Russia, the EU and Ukraine all met in Geneva, where all sides agreed to halt all violence and provocations in Ukraine. But the news media are still taking an antagonistic stance toward Vladimir Putin and Russia. What gives? Today, Marc Faber explains the hypocrisy behind U.S. foreign policy... and the BS the news media are pushing about it...