Jason Farrell

Doug Casey, founder of Casey Research and Daily Reckoning contributor, granted an interview to FutureMoneyTrends.com at FreedomFest in Las Vegas last weekend, sounding dire warnings about the future of the U.S.

“You MUST… get assets outside of the U.S., and ideally have a crib outside the U.S., because this place is on the edge of possible chaos… you’ve got to look elsewhere where you’re not considered the property of some other government.”

Casey suggested Asia and South America, particularly Argentina, as places where the government “leaves you alone.” Casey believes in the utility of getting a second passport, but not in the country where you will be residing, to ensure the local government treats you as a guest.

“You’re much wiser going to a different country where they’re incapable of being an effective police state. And with the militarization of the police and all these dangerous praetorian agencies that are blooming like poison mushrooms after a rainstorm… it’s very scary being in the U.S., especially if you have the wrong kind of ideas.”

Comment and let us know what you think!

Jason Farrell

Jason M. Farrell is a writer based in Washington D.C. and Baltimore, MD. Before joining Agora Financial in 2012 he was a research fellow at the Center for Competitive Politics, where his work was cited by the New York Post, Albany Times Union and the New York State Senate. He has been published at United Liberty, The Federalist, The Daily Caller and LewRockwell.com among many other blogs and news sites.

  • Tom Sawyer

    As much as I am concerned about the US as the author I don’t for one minute have any delusions of any govt having to treat me as a guest because I have another country’s passport. There is a reason a third world country is a third world country.

  • What?

    How can anyone point to Argentina as a country that cannot become a police state? What does one make of the military regime of the late 1970s and early 1980s, the period of the so-called “dirty war.”

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